Daily Archives: September 11, 2018

12 September, Wednesday – The Sermon On The Plain

12 September – Holy Name of Mary

This feast is a counterpart to the Feast of the Holy Name of Jesus (January 3); both have the possibility of uniting people easily divided on other matters. The feast of the Most Holy Name of Mary began in Spain in 1513 and in 1671 was extended to all of Spain and the Kingdom of Naples. In 1683, John Sobieski, king of Poland, brought an army to the outskirts of Vienna to stop the advance of Muslim armies loyal to Mohammed IV in Constantinople. After Sobieski entrusted himself to the Blessed Virgin Mary, he and his soldiers thoroughly defeated the Muslims. Pope Innocent XI extended this feast to the entire Church.

– Patron Saints Index

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1 Corinthians 7:25-31

About remaining celibate, I have no directions from the Lord but give my own opinion as one who, by the Lord’s mercy, has stayed faithful. Well then, I believe that in these present times of stress this is right: that it is good for a man to stay as he is. If you are tied to a wife, do not look for freedom; if you are free of a wife, then do not look for one. But if you marry, it is no sin, and it is not a sin for a young girl to get married. They will have their troubles, though, in their married life, and I should like to spare you that.

Brothers, this is what I mean: our time is growing short. Those who have wives should live as though they had none, and those who mourn should live as though they had nothing to mourn for; those who are enjoying life should live as though there were nothing to laugh about; those whose life is buying things should live as though they had nothing of their own; and those who have to deal with the world should not become engrossed in it. I say this because the world as we know it is passing away.

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Luke 6:20-26

Fixing his eyes on his disciples Jesus said:

‘How happy are you who are poor: yours is the kingdom of God.
Happy you who are hungry now: you shall be satisfied.
Happy you who weep now: you shall laugh.

Happy are you when people hate you, drive you out, abuse you, denounce your name as criminal, on account of the Son of Man. Rejoice when that day comes and dance for joy, for then your reward will be great in heaven. This was the way their ancestors treated the prophets.

‘But alas for you who are rich: you are having your consolation now.
Alas for you who have your fill now: you shall go hungry.
Alas for you who laugh now: you shall mourn and weep.

‘Alas for you when the world speaks well of you! This was the way their ancestors treated the false prophets.’

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“For the world in its present form is passing away”

Imagine the setting – Jesus has been praying all night. At the crack of dawn, he stirs. His disciples are still as they watch him. He chooses twelve men from amongst them, men he thinks will take his new church forward, who will do his father’s work. He smiles, tired but satisfied. He comes slowly down the hill. His disciples follow tentatively behind. Everyone is hushed, overwhelmed by their thoughts. The rays of sunlight illuminate the thirteen men as they come into sight. Flushed from exhilaration, overcome by emotion, awed by the nearness of Christ, the apostles glow from within.

Standing on the plain that morning watching the whole scene play out, the significance of that visual would not have been lost on the crowd gathered there. They would have remembered the old Hebrew stories of another saviour generations before, one who had liberated his people from slavery, who went up the mountain to bring down God’s commandments. Here, as Jesus addressed the throng, that sense of a new order would not have been lost on them. This was God’s plan for humanity, a plan to save them from their sins, a plan to set them free. Jesus was the new Messiah.

“The world in its present form is passing away” (1 Cor 7:31), cries Paul. This is the fundamental message of the Sermon On The Plain, a message of rebirth and renewal. Through Christ, the old order would give way to the new. Jesus himself had proclaimed as such just a few verses before, in the parable of the ‘old and new’ – “No one tears a piece from a new coat to put it on an old one… no one puts new wine into old wineskins… new wine must be put in fresh skins” (Luke 5: 36-38). This message of renewal is all the more relevant now as our Church struggles to purify itself. There will be some of us whose faith will be shaken, some who will give up and fall away, some who will go back to their old ways. In this time of chaos, when you can’t tell the difference between what’s real or false, or who God’s prophets are, go back to the one thing that is unshakeable – the Word of God. Read the Bible, meditate on its truths. Read them to your children, to your families, to all those close to you. Hold on to it, pray on it. It will be your anchor and your filter. Its message will cut through the noise. In every age, Christ has been the source of all renewal. He will not fail us now if we call to him and hold on to him. Like the throng gathered on the plain that morning, remember that you too have been called, you too are blessed, and you are to rejoice when you are denounced for holding on to Christ.

“Rejoice and leap for joy on that day! Behold, your reward will be great in heaven!”

(Today’s OXYGEN by Sharon Soo)

Prayer: We pray for the endurance and spiritual maturity to be able to withstand this time of chaos in our Church. We pray that God helps us to discern His true prophets.

Thanksgiving: We give thanks for those who silently toil for the good of God’s house, who live their faith on the understanding that God’s is the only opinion that matters.