Category Archives: Ordinary Time

25 February, Tuesday – Daddy! Daddy!

25 February

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James 4:1-10

Where do these wars and battles between yourselves first start? Isn’t it precisely in the desires fighting inside your own selves? You want something and you haven’t got it; so you are prepared to kill. You have an ambition that you cannot satisfy; so you fight to get your way by force. Why you don’t have what you want is because you don’t pray for it; when you do pray and don’t get it, it is because you have not prayed properly, you have prayed for something to indulge your own desires.
You are as unfaithful as adulterous wives; don’t you realise that making the world your friend is making God your enemy?

Anyone who chooses the world for his friend turns himself into God’s enemy. Surely you don’t think scripture is wrong when it says: the spirit which he sent to live in us wants us for himself alone? But he has been even more generous to us, as scripture says: God opposes the proud but he gives generously to the humble. Give in to God, then; resist the devil, and he will run away from you. The nearer you go to God, the nearer he will come to you. Clean your hands, you sinners, and clear your minds, you waverers. Look at your wretched condition, and weep for it in misery; be miserable instead of laughing, gloomy instead of happy. Humble yourselves before the Lord and he will lift you up.

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Mark 9:30-37

Jesus and his disciples made their way through Galilee; and he did not want anyone to know, because he was instructing his disciples; he was telling them, ‘The Son of Man will be delivered into the hands of men; they will put him to death; and three days after he has been put to death he will rise again.’ But they did not understand what he said and were afraid to ask him.

They came to Capernaum, and when he was in the house he asked them, ‘What were you arguing about on the road?’ They said nothing because they had been arguing which of them was the greatest. So he sat down, called the Twelve to him and said, ‘If anyone wants to be first, he must make himself last of all and servant of all.’ He then took a little child, set him in front of them, put his arms round him, and said to them, ‘Anyone who welcomes one of these little children in my name, welcomes me; and anyone who welcomes me welcomes not me but the one who sent me.’

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“Anyone who welcomes one of these little children in my name, welcomes me”

 A friend of mine from junior college once asked me if I would continue to be a Christian if my life was really difficult. It was his view that I was happy and prayed only because my life was smooth-sailing.

I took some time to think about it; then confidently, I said “Yes”.

That took place about ten years ago. Since that question was asked me, I had left a job which I had stopped enjoying. Overnight, I experienced such a major change to my self-image. I struggled with sadness, and ultimately, depression.

The best thing for me, though, was that this time gave me an  opportunity to spend time both by myself, with my family, but also to spend time with God. Despite all the challenges I was facing, I found comfort in spending time with Him. I had never previously had a personal ‘God’ experience, and this was the first time that I really did.

I am familiar with the Gospel of today, but until then, had never really understood it; it was only when “we let go, and let God” that we begin to grow. When we let go of the adult in us, we are free to become little children. It is when we let go, that our hands are free to know God.

Let us continue to reach out to God like the children that we are.

(Today’s Oxygen by Paul Wee)

Prayer: We ask You Father, to teach us to remain as little children in Your eyes. Help us to always reach out to You.

Thanksgiving: Thank you Jesus, for Your teachings. We are grateful for Your eternal and unconditional love for us.

24 February, Monday – Running on empty

24 February

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James 3:13-18

If there are any wise or learned men among you, let them show it by their good lives, with humility and wisdom in their actions. But if at heart you have the bitterness of jealousy, or a self-seeking ambition, never make any claims for yourself or cover up the truth with lies – principles of this kind are not the wisdom that comes down from above: they are only earthly, animal and devilish. Wherever you find jealousy and ambition, you find disharmony, and wicked things of every kind being done; whereas the wisdom that comes down from above is essentially something pure; it also makes for peace, and is kindly and considerate; it is full of compassion and shows itself by doing good; nor is there any trace of partiality or hypocrisy in it. Peacemakers, when they work for peace, sow the seeds which will bear fruit in holiness.

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Mark 9:14-29

When Jesus, with Peter, James and John came down from the mountain and rejoined the disciples, they saw a large crowd round them and some scribes arguing with them. The moment they saw him the whole crowd were struck with amazement and ran to greet him. ‘What are you arguing about with them?’ he asked. A man answered him from the crowd, ‘Master, I have brought my son to you; there is a spirit of dumbness in him, and when it takes hold of him it throws him to the ground, and he foams at the mouth and grinds his teeth and goes rigid. And I asked your disciples to cast it out and they were unable to.’ ‘You faithless generation’ he said to them in reply. ‘How much longer must I be with you? How much longer must I put up with you? Bring him to me.’ They brought the boy to him, and as soon as the spirit saw Jesus it threw the boy into convulsions, and he fell to the ground and lay writhing there, foaming at the mouth. Jesus asked the father, ‘How long has this been happening to him?’ ‘From childhood,’ he replied ‘and it has often thrown him into the fire and into the water, in order to destroy him. But if you can do anything, have pity on us and help us.’ ‘If you can?’ retorted Jesus. ‘Everything is possible for anyone who has faith.’

Immediately the father of the boy cried out, ‘I do have faith. Help the little faith I have!’ And when Jesus saw how many people were pressing round him, he rebuked the unclean spirit. ‘Deaf and dumb spirit,’ he said ‘I command you: come out of him and never enter him again.’ Then throwing the boy into violent convulsions it came out shouting, and the boy lay there so like a corpse that most of them said, ‘He is dead.’ But Jesus took him by the hand and helped him up, and he was able to stand. When he had gone indoors his disciples asked him privately, ‘Why were we unable to cast it out?’ ‘This is the kind’ he answered ‘that can only be driven out by prayer.’

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“This is the kind… that can only be driven out by prayer”

My wife has been sending me messages and articles to read via WhatsApp, encouraging me to take better care of myself; to detach from work, to eat better, to rest more. As you can probably guess by now, I do not do this well; I sleep something like 4-6 hours nightly, typically start work at about 4 in the morning and do not have a regular exercise programme.

This has begun to take a toll on me recently.  I have become tired more easily, am short-tempered and generally not so nice to be around.

I have a wise spouse. Indeed, after the times I have taken better care of myself, I find that I am happier, more productive and a more loving husband and father.

Indeed, this is the same with our faith and our service.

My wife and I were once cell group leaders for a few couples. Being new to this, we were anxious but at the same time, enthusiastic. We threw ourselves into our roles and worked hard. Yet, we felt that we were ‘fake’ and not worthy of being cell group leaders. After a couple of years, we left the group.

Some time later, we realised that while we did pray during the period of service, we did not spend real time with our Lord. We mouthed our prayers superficially but did not build on our relationship with Him; we were trying to do everything on our own, depending on our own abilities.

Indeed, in order to be able to work in His name, we must truly have a close relationship with God. We need to continually tap into His fireplace; to draw warmth and strength. We cannot, and must not, ever try to do it on our own, if we are to do great things in His name.

(Today’s Oxygen by Paul Wee)

Prayer: We pray that we may remember to always build a relationship with You, Father. Help us to grow in faith and in love for You.

Thanksgiving: We are grateful for our Lord Jesus, who shows us how to spend time with You, Father. Thank You for helping us realise that we never have to do it on our own, that we can always tap into You.

23 February, Sunday – Pride, our stumbling block

23 February

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Leviticus 19:1-2,17-18

The Lord spoke to Moses; he said: ‘Speak to the whole community of the sons of Israel and say to them:
‘“Be holy, for I, the Lord your God, am holy.

‘“You must not bear hatred for your brother in your heart. You must openly tell him, your neighbour, of his offence; this way you will not take a sin upon yourself. You must not exact vengeance, nor must you bear a grudge against the children of your people. You must love your neighbour as yourself. I am the Lord.”’

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1 Corinthians 3:16-23

Didn’t you realise that you were God’s temple and that the Spirit of God was living among you? If anybody should destroy the temple of God, God will destroy him, because the temple of God is sacred; and you are that temple.

Make no mistake about it: if any one of you thinks of himself as wise, in the ordinary sense of the word, then he must learn to be a fool before he really can be wise. Why? Because the wisdom of this world is foolishness to God.

As scripture says: The Lord knows wise men’s thoughts: he knows how useless they are; or again: God is not convinced by the arguments of the wise. So there is nothing to boast about in anything human: Paul, Apollos, Cephas, the world, life and death, the present and the future, are all your servants; but you belong to Christ and Christ belongs to God.

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Matthew 5:38-48

Jesus said to his disciples: ‘You have learnt how it was said: Eye for eye and tooth for tooth. But I say this to you: offer the wicked man no resistance. On the contrary, if anyone hits you on the right cheek, offer him the other as well; if a man takes you to law and would have your tunic, let him have your cloak as well. And if anyone orders you to go one mile, go two miles with him. Give to anyone who asks, and if anyone wants to borrow, do not turn away.

‘You have learnt how it was said: You must love your neighbour and hate your enemy. But I say this to you: love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you; in this way you will be sons of your Father in heaven, for he causes his sun to rise on bad men as well as good, and his rain to fall on honest and dishonest men alike. For if you love those who love you, what right have you to claim any credit? Even the tax collectors do as much, do they not? And if you save your greetings for your brothers, are you doing anything exceptional? Even the pagans do as much, do they not? You must therefore be perfect just as your heavenly Father is perfect.’

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“… he must learn to be a fool before he really can be wise…”

I have been recently troubled by some issues at work, and in the course of these ‘troubles’, I got into a spat with one of my colleagues. Suffice to say that the interactions have gotten rather heated of late, and we ended up having a face-to-face confrontation.

I was feeling frustrated as I believed I was doing my best to help others, and felt the other person was being self-centred and protective over her ‘territory’.

In preparing for today’s reflection, I felt God addressing me directly.

Firstly, the Gospel today spoke about “turning the other cheek”. I felt these verses speaking to me and I sat with this for a few days. I was puzzled. There were other situations in the Bible when Jesus got angry (such as the time Jesus chased the merchants out of the Temple as detailed in Matthew 21:12-17), where He certainly didn’t turn His cheek.

Then it struck me. That to me, it was not about the act of turning one’s cheek at all. Instead, it was a question of one’s pride preventing one from doing so.

In the work scenario I mentioned above, I realised that it was never about my colleague being selfish. What triggered me was the perception that she was arrogant and that she did not give me due respect.

The second reading of today talks about wisdom, and how worldly wisdom is seen as foolishness by God. In my effort to help others, I did not realise that I was, in fact, acting on my own accord. I failed to consider the feelings of others, or even to seek out their opinions! Instead of being wise, I was demonstrating my foolishness!

I am constantly amazed by how our God speaks to me. In today’s readings, God guides and rebukes me at the same time. I feel His love and am confident that no matter how challenging the journey, and how many mistakes I make, He will watch out for me.

(Today’s Oxygen by Paul Wee)

Prayer: Father God, we pray that we may be able to slow down to listen to Your promptings. Help us to always be open to You.

Thanksgiving: We thank You, Father God, for always sending Your Spirit to be there with us. Thank you for blessing us always with Your love, constant guidance and protection.

22 February, Saturday – The Rock of the Church

22 Feb – Feast of the Chair of St. Peter, the Apostle

The feast of the Chair of St. Peter at Rome, Italy has been celebrated from the early days of the Christian era on Jan 18, in commemoration of the day when St. Peter held his first service in Rome. The feast of the Chair of St. Peter at Antioch commemorating his foundation of the See of Antioch, has also been long celebrated at Rome, on Feb 22. At each place a chair (cathedra) which the Apostle had used while presiding at Mass was venerated.

  • Patron Saint Index

This feast has been kept in Rome since the fourth century, as a symbol of the unity of the Church.

  • The Weekday Missal

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1 Peter 5:1-4

Now I have something to tell your elders: I am an elder myself, and a witness to the sufferings of Christ, and with you I have a share in the glory that is to be revealed. Be the shepherds of the flock of God that is entrusted to you: watch over it, not simply as a duty but gladly, because God wants it; not for sordid money, but because you are eager to do it. Never be a dictator over any group that is put in your charge, but be an example that the whole flock can follow. When the chief shepherd appears, you will be given the crown of unfading glory.

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Matthew 16:13-19

When Jesus came to the region of Caesarea Philippi he put this question to his disciples, ‘Who do people say the Son of Man is?’ And they said, ‘Some say he is John the Baptist, some Elijah, and others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.’ ‘But you,’ he said ‘who do you say I am?’ Then Simon Peter spoke up, ‘You are the Christ,’ he said ‘the Son of the living God.’ Jesus replied, ‘Simon son of Jonah, you are a happy man! Because it was not flesh and blood that revealed this to you but my Father in heaven. So I now say to you: You are Peter and on this rock I will build my Church. And the gates of the underworld can never hold out against it. I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven: whatever you bind on earth shall be considered bound in heaven; whatever you loose on earth shall be considered loosed in heaven.’

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“And upon this rock I will build my Church.”

The world has been faced with a lot of unpleasant news lately. The devastating bush fires in Australia, the conflict between Iran and USA, all-time hottest temperature in Antarctica, and the one that’s hitting closest to home, the proliferation of the COVID-19 virus.

On 14 February, our Archbishop made a very tough decision — to suspend all public masses indefinitely, so that we Catholics can be responsible in playing our part to contain the spread of this virus. My WhatsApp messages were going off non-stop that Friday evening, people forwarding messages and hearsay, everyone speculating the authenticity of the message. The catholic.sg website was crashing probably from the sheer numbers of people trying to log on at the same time.

Until the news was confirmed on the various official channels – Facebook, Telegram, and the website was also finally restored. Many, including myself, were somewhat in disbelief and shock. Cancellation of masses was unheard of, at least in my time. It must not have been easy for the Church to come to this difficult but necessary decision.

I was feeling rather sad and lost that suddenly we would be unable to attend mass and receive the Eucharist. Perhaps we have been taking the privilege and ease of having Mass for granted. There are those in other countries who don’t have this same privilege as us in Singapore — to celebrate mass daily so easily and frequently. Perhaps having this privilege taken away from us is what we need to remember the sanctity and better appreciate the beauty of the mass. Is it even more fitting that the Lenten season is around the corner, a season of penance and contemplation? Absence can sometimes bring us more time, clarity and renewal.

Fr Joachim wrote a very apt and beautiful prayer which I would like to share:

“Dearest Lord,

When we lose something dear to us, give us the grace to appreciate what we had.

When we lose something important and not miss it, give us the grace to rediscover its importance and yearn for it again.

When it is something so important that we cannot have, after losing it, give us the grace to appreciate that God is never restricted by circumstances to still give what is necessary for us, for grace abounds when all else may fail.

Most of all, we may lose everything, but let us never lose our God.

Amen”

(Today’s Oxygen by Kristel Wang)

Prayer: Dear Jesus, we pray for the strength and courage in these trying times. Help us not to be fearful or paranoid, but to cling onto your truth. Grant us the grace to continue to be your faithful servants, even without being able to physically attend mass and receive the Eucharist, but to make an act of spiritual communion every week.

Thanksgiving: Thank you Heavenly Father, for giving us the opportunity to see rainbows through the rain. Thank you for the graces that abound in us in the difficult times. Amen.

21 February, Friday – The Lost

21 Feb – Memorial for St. Peter Damian, bishop and doctor

Peter Damian (1007-1072) was the youngest child in a large family. When he was orphaned, he was sent to live with a brother where he was mistreated and forced to work as a swine-herd. He cared for another brother, a priest in Ravenna, Italy. He was well educated in Fienza and Parma and became a professor, but lived a life of strict austerity.

He gave up his teaching to become a Benedictine monk. His health suffered, especially when he tried to replace sleep with prayer. He founded a hermitage. He was occasionally called on by the Vatican to make peace between arguing monastic houses, clergymen, and government officials, etc. He was made Cardinal-Bishop of Ostia, and he fought simony.

He tried to restore primitive discipline among priests and religious who were becoming more and more of the world. He was a prolific correspondent, and he also wrote dozens of sermons, seven biographies (including one of St. Romuald), and poetry, including some of the best Latin of the time. He tried to retire being a monk, but was routinely recalled as a papal legate.

He died on Feb 22, 1072 of fever at Ravenna while surrounded by brother monks reciting the Divine Office. He was declared a Doctor of the Church in 1828.

  • Patron Saint Index

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James 2:14-24,26

Take the case, my brothers, of someone who has never done a single good act but claims that he has faith. Will that faith save him? If one of the brothers or one of the sisters is in need of clothes and has not enough food to live on, and one of you says to them, ‘I wish you well; keep yourself warm and eat plenty’, without giving them these bare necessities of life, then what good is that? Faith is like that: if good works do not go with it, it is quite dead.

This is the way to talk to people of that kind: ‘You say you have faith and I have good deeds; I will prove to you that I have faith by showing you my good deeds – now you prove to me that you have faith without any good deeds to show. You believe in the one God – that is creditable enough, but the demons have the same belief, and they tremble with fear. Do realise, you senseless man, that faith without good deeds is useless. You surely know that Abraham our father was justified by his deed, because he offered his son Isaac on the altar? There you see it: faith and deeds were working together; his faith became perfect by what he did. This is what scripture really means when it says: Abraham put his faith in God, and this was counted as making him justified; and that is why he was called ‘the friend of God.’

You see now that it is by doing something good, and not only by believing, that a man is justified. A body dies when it is separated from the spirit, and in the same way faith is dead if it is separated from good deeds.

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Mark 8:34-9:1

Jesus called the people and his disciples to him and said:
‘If anyone wants to be a follower of mine, let him renounce himself and take up his cross and follow me. For anyone who wants to save his life will lose it; but anyone who loses his life for my sake, and for the sake of the gospel, will save it. What gain, then, is it for a man to win the whole world and ruin his life? And indeed what can a man offer in exchange for his life? For if anyone in this adulterous and sinful generation is ashamed of me and of my words, the Son of Man will also be ashamed of him when he comes in the glory of his Father with the holy angels.’ And he said to them, ‘I tell you solemnly, there are some standing here who will not taste death before they see the kingdom of God come with power.’

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“Anyone who wants to save his life will lose it; but anyone who loses his life for my sake, and for the sake of the gospel, will save it”

As we approach the end of the week, the readings provide us with a timely reminder of the purpose of our lives, why we live and who are we living for.

In the readings today, we read of “as a body without a spirit is dead, so is faith without deeds” and also how “anyone who wants to save his life will lose it; but anyone who loses his life for my sake, will save it”.

We are invited to reflect upon our purpose and calling in this life. Especially facing such situations where there is panic and uncertainty, we are called to be witnesses, not to lose our lives or lose our opportunity for survival, but instead, to be a gift, to be an example to the lost.

Many have lost their purpose and are lost in terms of their direction, that self-preservation seems like the way to go. Instead, our lives are not about how long we live but how we have lived out this life.

For fear of missing out, most have been influenced by society and have failed to speak out and to take action — whether it’s speaking the truth, providing truthful information regarding the virus and its spreading, whether we have provided truthful information on our healthcare and its resources.

When there is a lack of voices and action, the people become lost, and we become controlled by our instincts instead of being able to think clearly and with empathy to respond to the situation.

Let the battle against the virus and be human versus the virus because at the moment, it seems to be that we are merely defending ourselves, leaving the minority to battle the viruses for us alone. Let us not just talk and pray behind the scenes, but truly take an active role in being a gift to the lost around us. Amen.

(Today’s OXYGEN by Benjamin Mao)

Prayer: Dear Lord, we pray that many more will come to know you and your love, to know that our lives are so much more, that we are able to contribute, be a gift, make a difference, to start a ripple and see how it can transform a culture. Dear Lord, help us to rely on you especially when we seem to want to rely on our own strength. We pray for wisdom and courage especially during this difficult time.

Thanksgiving: Heavenly Father, we lift up our own personal intentions of thanks for _______________________________ (feel free to vocalise your thanks)

19 February, Wednesday – The Cure

19 February

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James 1:19-27

Remember this, my dear brothers: be quick to listen but slow to speak and slow to rouse your temper; God’s righteousness is never served by man’s anger; so do away with all the impurities and bad habits that are still left in you – accept and submit to the word which has been planted in you and can save your souls. But you must do what the word tells you, and not just listen to it and deceive yourselves. To listen to the word and not obey is like looking at your own features in a mirror and then, after a quick look, going off and immediately forgetting what you looked like. But the man who looks steadily at the perfect law of freedom and makes that his habit – not listening and then forgetting, but actively putting it into practice – will be happy in all that he does.

Nobody must imagine that he is religious while he still goes on deceiving himself and not keeping control over his tongue; anyone who does this has the wrong idea of religion. Pure, unspoilt religion, in the eyes of God our Father is this: coming to the help of orphans and widows when they need it, and keeping oneself uncontaminated by the world.

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Mark 8:22-26

Jesus and his disciples came to Bethsaida, and some people brought to him a blind man whom they begged him to touch. He took the blind man by the hand and led him outside the village. Then putting spittle on his eyes and laying his hands on him, he asked, ‘Can you see anything?’ The man, who was beginning to see, replied, ‘I can see people; they look like trees to me, but they are walking about.’ Then he laid his hands on the man’s eyes again and he saw clearly; he was cured, and he could see everything plainly and distinctly. And Jesus sent him home, saying, ‘Do not even go into the village.’

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“You must do what the Word tells you and not just listen to it and deceive yourselves.”

A Blessed New Year to one and all.

This is my first reflection for OXYGEN for the year. As I was reflecting on today’s readings, it made me think about my journey with OXYGEN — from a place of passion, spirit and conviction, to many times, a place of struggle and maybe even burden to submit my reflections in the midst of my ‘busy’ life.

I realised that the journey in my reflections seems so long because in writing this, I always had to make that seeming detour back to Christ, who I guess I’ve been not prioritising, compared to the seemingly more ‘urgent’ things in my life. Despite reducing the number of reflections I write in a year, I chose not to give up because I knew how important it is not just to write, but also to reflect and connect with God through His Word. If I gave up on this, Christ would probably seem much further away and the effort I will need to ‘return’ would seem all that much greater.

I must admit that these reflections have helped me so much in the various situations and the most stressful periods of my life, indeed, how God can speak to me through His Word.

I hope, He will speak to you today and for the many days to come.

In today’s first reading, we read of how knowing and listening to the Word isn’t enough; but how we are called to live out the Word, through our lives and through action. We also see in the Gospel how Christ gave sight to the blind man.

Especially in the circumstances we are facing today, the coronavirus, we see how uncertainty and due to all sorts of information spreading with or without credibility, has blinded us to focus on protecting ourselves instead of others. We then see how this particular culture or response ends up spreading much faster than the virus itself, causing panic and instability amongst the public.

I’ve also become blind when my reflections became more of a duty versus a sharing of life and breaking of the Word. Both situations are similar because they both didn’t have the cure. The cure being Christ — not just to remove our blindness, but to see as how He sees, to live as how He lives and to love as how He loves.

Because in the darkest of situations and no matter how seemingly ‘far’ we are from Him, He is actually right there with us and we just have to allow Him into our lives once again. It is in that allowing that we can say we are living out His Word, for it is not I but Christ who lives in me. Amen.

(Today’s OXYGEN by Benjamin Mao)

Prayer: Dear Lord, we pray for everyone who is infected, suffering, who has gone before us, we pray that we may not lose humanity and what it means to be human. We pray that we will learn how to trust, that leaders will look after their people, that we will create a culture that protects and provides and not one that competes and condemns. Dear Lord, we ask that your light may shine ever so brightly in our darkness, that we may see and realise our selfishness, to allow your Word to take place in our hearts and that we may proclaim it by our actions. Amen.

Thanksgiving: Thank you Lord, for the many people who are working behind the scenes and doing whatever they can to protect and provide. Thank you for always reaching out to us in so many different ways. Thank you for always being there.

18 February, Tuesday – Sharing the Lord’s providence

18 February

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James 1:12-18

Happy the man who stands firm when trials come. He has proved himself, and will win the prize of life, the crown that the Lord has promised to those who love him.

Never, when you have been tempted, say, ‘God sent the temptation’; God cannot be tempted to do anything wrong, and he does not tempt anybody. Everyone who is tempted is attracted and seduced by his own wrong desire. Then the desire conceives and gives birth to sin, and when sin is fully grown, it too has a child, and the child is death.

Make no mistake about this, my dear brothers: it is all that is good, everything that is perfect, which is given us from above; it comes down from the Father of all light; with him there is no such thing as alteration, no shadow of a change. By his own choice he made us his children by the message of the truth so that we should be a sort of first-fruits of all that he had created.

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Mark 8:14-21

The disciples had forgotten to take any food and they had only one loaf with them in the boat. Then he gave them this warning, ‘Keep your eyes open; be on your guard against the yeast of the Pharisees and the yeast of Herod.’ And they said to one another, ‘It is because we have no bread.’ And Jesus knew it, and he said to them, ‘Why are you talking about having no bread? Do you not yet understand? Have you no perception? Are your minds closed? Have you eyes that do not see, ears that do not hear? Or do you not remember? When I broke the five loaves among the five thousand, how many baskets full of scraps did you collect?’ They answered, ‘Twelve.’ ‘And when I broke the seven loaves for the four thousand, how many baskets full of scraps did you collect?’ And they answered, ‘Seven.’ Then he said to them, ‘Are you still without perception?’

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Do you have eyes and not see, ears and not hear?”

Today’s gospel readings are particularly relevant to the situation in Singapore, where the ongoing novel Coronavirus crisis has sparked off a spate of supermarket runs and hoarding of daily necessities by citizens. In these times, everyone is hoping to obtain enough food and necessities for his or her own family. The fear that drives these actions is reminiscent of the doubt that must have arisen among the disciples, both in today’s gospel and in Matthew 14:13-21, where Jesus had fed the five thousand with five loaves and two fishes.

Indeed, that latter event is precisely why Jesus asked His disciples: “Do you have eyes and not see, ears and not hear?”, for they appeared to have forgotten about the time that Jesus himself provided food for everyone, even when it did not seem there was enough. In these dire times, we too must take our Lord’s words to heart. If He had provided the five thousand with sufficient food, what more us, who live in abundance but act as if there was none to share.

If we are to take the Lord’s lesson to heart, perhaps a way out of this situation would be to share what we have, and consume only what we need. Beyond Singapore and the novel Coronavirus, this applies to our use of the world’s natural resources as well. The Lord has already provided us with all that we need in this world. Are we ready to accept this truth, and live confidently in His providence, rather than live in constant fear of deprivation and lack?

(Today’s Oxygen by Jacob Woo)

Prayer: Dear Lord, please give us the strength and grace to overcome the daily afflictions that we face in our daily lives. May we learn to receive your love and to trust in Your providence. 

Thanksgiving: Lord, we are thankful for the life that You have given us, and for always providing Your children with all that they need.   

17 February, Monday – Trusting in God’s little miracles

17 Feb – Memorial for Seven Holy Founders of the Order of Servites

The Order of the Servants of Mary (Servites) was named the fifth mendicant order by Pope Martin V. It was founded in 1233 by Sts. Alexis Falconieri, Bartholomew degli Amidei, Benedict dell’Antella, Buonfiglio Monaldi, Gherardino Sostegni, Hugh dei Lippi-Uguccioni, and John Buonagiunta Monetti.

They were beatified on 1 December 1717, and canonized on 1887 as The Seven Holy Founders. On the Feast of the Assumption in 1240, the Founders received a vision of Our Lady. She held in her hand a black habit, and a nearby angel bore a scroll reading “Servants of Mary”. Mary told them:

“You will found a new order, and you will be my witnesses throughout the world. This is your name: Servants of Mary. This is your rule: that of St. Augustine. And here is your distinctive sign: the black scapular, in memory of my sufferings.”

From their first establishment at La Camarzia, near Florence, they moved to the more secluded Monte Senario where the Blessed Virgin herself conferred on them their habit, instructing them to follow the Rule of St. Augustine and to admit associates. The official approval for the order was obtained in 1249, confirmed in 1256, suppressed in 1276, definitely approved in 1304, and again by Brief in 1928. The order was so rapidly diffused that by 1285, there were 10,000 members with houses in Germany, France, Italy, and Spain, and early in the 14th century, it numbered 100 convents, besides missions in Crete and India.

The Reformation reduced the order in Germany, but it flourished elsewhere. Again meeting with political reverses in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, it nevertheless prospered, being established in England in 1867, and in America in 1870.

The Servites take solemn vows and venerate in a special manner the “Seven Dolours of Our Lady”. They cultivate both the interior and the active life, giving missions and teaching. An affiliation, professing exclusively the contemplative life is that of the “Hermits of Monte Senario”. It was reinstated in France in 1922.

Cloistered nuns, forming a Second Order, have been affiliated with the Servites since 1619 when Blessed Benedicta di Rossi called the nuns of her community “Servite Hermitesses”. They have been established in England, Spain, Italy, the Tyrol, and Germany.

A Third Order, the Mantellate, founded by St. Juliana Falconieri under St. Philip Benizi (c. 1284) has houses in Italy, France, Spain, England, Canada, and the United States. Secular tertiaries and a confraternity of the Seven Dolours are other branches.

  • Patron Saint Index

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James 1:1-11

From James, servant of God and of the Lord Jesus Christ. Greetings to the twelve tribes of the Dispersion.

My brothers, you will always have your trials but, when they come, try to treat them as a happy privilege; you understand that your faith is only put to the test to make you patient, but patience too is to have its practical results so that you will become fully-developed, complete, with nothing missing.

If there is any one of you who needs wisdom, he must ask God, who gives to all freely and ungrudgingly; it will be given to him. But he must ask with faith, and no trace of doubt, because a person who has doubts is like the waves thrown up in the sea when the wind drives. That sort of person, in two minds, wavering between going different ways, must not expect that the Lord will give him anything.

It is right for the poor brother to be proud of his high rank, and the rich one to be thankful that he has been humbled, because riches last no longer than the flowers in the grass; the scorching sun comes up, and the grass withers, the flower falls; what looked so beautiful now disappears. It is the same with the rich man: his business goes on; he himself perishes.

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Mark 8:11-13

The Pharisees came up and started a discussion with Jesus; they demanded of him a sign from heaven, to test him. And with a sigh that came straight from the heart he said, ‘Why does this generation demand a sign? I tell you solemnly, no sign shall be given to this generation.’ And leaving them again and re-embarking, he went away to the opposite shore.

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Amen, I say to you, no sign will be given to this generation”

How often have we been like the Pharisees, asking Jesus (or even God Himself!) for some sign of His love or faithfulness? Perhaps even more so than the Pharisees, we in this modern age seek ever greater signs and symbols of the divine, having been raised on a media diet of computer generated imagery (CGI) and movies. In this media saturated world of superheroes and Hollywood magic, it is easy to forget that God continues to weave His presence and work within the humdrum of our daily lives.

I did my RCIA (Rite of Christian Initiation for Adults) at a Jesuit parish, and the spiritual director of the RCIA taught us Ignatian spirituality. I remember how each time before we ‘enter the scene’ of our Ignatian contemplation, the priest would ask us to sit in silence and feel the presence of God in the air around us, and in the air that we are breathing in. That in itself is the miracle. God does not need to give us any signs, because the very air that we breathe is a gift from Him.

Perhaps this is why Jesus said that ‘no sign will be given to this generation’. Because God has already given us ample signs of His love and providence. It is also striking that James in the first reading says “consider it all joy, my brothers and sisters, when you encounter various trials, for you know that the testing of your faith produces perseverance. And let perseverance be perfect, so that you may be perfect and complete, lacking in nothing”.

Indeed, that very perseverance and faith in God is itself a grace and sign from our Father in heaven. This also means that we need to play our part, in order to see these signs and receives these graces that are freely given to us. And what exactly is this part that we need to do? We simply need to trust Him and to persevere in times of hardship, suffering and persecution.

(Today’s Oxygen by Jacob Woo)

Prayer: Lord, we pray for Your love and grace, and above all, for the wisdom to see how You have always given these to us.

Thanksgiving: We are thankful, O Lord, for the daily gifts and graces that You have bestowed upon us. We are grateful for Your gift of life, and the chance that You have given us to continue loving, serving and praising You through our lives.  

16 February, Sunday – Obeying God in this world and the next

16 February

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Ecclesiasticus 15:16-21

If you wish, you can keep the commandments,
to behave faithfully is within your power.
He has set fire and water before you;
put out your hand to whichever you prefer.
Man has life and death before him;
whichever a man likes better will be given him.
For vast is the wisdom of the Lord;
he is almighty and all-seeing.
His eyes are on those who fear him,
he notes every action of man.
He never commanded anyone to be godless,
he has given no one permission to sin.

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1 Corinthians 2:6-10

We have a wisdom to offer those who have reached maturity: not a philosophy of our age, it is true, still less of the masters of our age, which are coming to their end. The hidden wisdom of God which we teach in our mysteries is the wisdom that God predestined to be for our glory before the ages began. It is a wisdom that none of the masters of this age have ever known, or they would not have crucified the Lord of Glory; we teach what scripture calls: the things that no eye has seen and no ear has heard, things beyond the mind of man, all that God has prepared for those who love him.

These are the very things that God has revealed to us through the Spirit, for the Spirit reaches the depths of everything, even the depths of God.

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Matthew 5:17-37

Jesus said to his disciples: ‘Do not imagine that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets. I have come not to abolish but to complete them. I tell you solemnly, till heaven and earth disappear, not one dot, not one little stroke, shall disappear from the Law until its purpose is achieved. Therefore, the man who infringes even one of the least of these commandments and teaches others to do the same will be considered the least in the kingdom of heaven; but the man who keeps them and teaches them will be considered great in the kingdom of heaven.

‘For I tell you, if your virtue goes no deeper than that of the scribes and Pharisees, you will never get into the kingdom of heaven.

‘You have learnt how it was said to our ancestors: You must not kill; and if anyone does kill he must answer for it before the court. But I say this to you: anyone who is angry with his brother will answer for it before the court; if a man calls his brother “Fool” he will answer for it before the Sanhedrin; and if a man calls him “Renegade” he will answer for it in hell fire. So then, if you are bringing your offering to the altar and there remember that your brother has something against you, leave your offering there before the altar, go and be reconciled with your brother first, and then come back and present your offering. Come to terms with your opponent in good time while you are still on the way to the court with him, or he may hand you over to the judge and the judge to the officer, and you will be thrown into prison. I tell you solemnly, you will not get out till you have paid the last penny.

‘You have learnt how it was said: You must not commit adultery. But I say this to you: if a man looks at a woman lustfully, he has already committed adultery with her in his heart. If your right eye should cause you to sin, tear it out and throw it away; for it will do you less harm to lose one part of you than to have your whole body thrown into hell. And if your right hand should cause you to sin, cut it off and throw it away; for it will do you less harm to lose one part of you than to have your whole body go to hell.

‘It has also been said: Anyone who divorces his wife must give her a writ of dismissal. But I say this to you: everyone who divorces his wife, except for the case of fornication, makes her an adulteress; and anyone who marries a divorced woman commits adultery.

‘Again, you have learnt how it was said to our ancestors: You must not break your oath, but must fulfil your oaths to the Lord. But I say this to you: do not swear at all, either by heaven, since that is God’s throne; or by the earth, since that is his footstool; or by Jerusalem, since that is the city of the great king. Do not swear by your own head either, since you cannot turn a single hair white or black. All you need say is “Yes” if you mean yes, “No” if you mean no; anything more than this comes from the evil one.’

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“If your right eye causes you to sin, tear it out and throw it away”

As Catholics, we often find ourselves existing in two dimensions of reality. On the one hand, we live in an increasingly secularised society that views religion with either suspicion or derision. On the other hand, we also try our very best to live our spiritual reality as faithful disciples of God. Certainly, both are important to us. But it is also true that both tend to pull us in opposite directions. This is all the more so for those who have been baptised as adults, like me.

Being the first and only baptised Catholic in my family, my relationship with elder family members has become increasingly strained with every year that passes. It has also become increasingly difficult to talk about issues that matter to me, but which may not be acceptable by the general cultural milieu of the times, such as my pro-life stance or the sanctity of marriage and family. And hence I exist in a strange duality of sorts, engaging in polite conversation about things of little importance with friends, relatives and colleagues but praying together with my faith community about our eternal fellowship with God. It is a difficult duality to navigate.

As the old song goes, “Torn between two lovers, feelin’ like a fool. Lovin’ both of you is breakin’ all the rules”.
It is indeed not possible to love both worlds. As today’s reading emphasises:

If your right eye causes you to sin,
tear it out and throw it away.
It is better for you to lose one of your members than to have your whole body thrown into Gehenna.
And if your right hand causes you to sin,
cut it off and throw it away.
It is better for you to lose one of your members than to have your whole body go into Gehenna.

Our obedience and faithfulness to our Lord may sometimes require that we stand firm against views that contravene our beliefs or efforts to sway our faith in God. We must be brave and not fear derision. As Jesus has told us in the Beatitudes: “Blessed are they who are persecuted for the sake of righteousness, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven” (Matthew 5:1-10). Just as Jesus chose obedience to God even until the point of death, so too must we choose obedience to God at the risk of persecution and derision.

(Today’s Oxygen by Jacob Woo)

Prayer: Lord, we ask for the strength and grace to continue living out Your will. May You continue to provide us with the spiritual sustenance necessary for being Your faithful disciples.

Thanksgiving: Heavenly Father, we thank You for your Word and Your wisdom. We thank You for being there always, yes even during the hard times.

15 February, Saturday – If you could see how much God loves

15 February

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1 Kings 12:26-32,13:33-34

Jeroboam thought to himself, ‘As things are, the kingdom will revert to the House of David. If this people continues to go up to the Temple of the Lord in Jerusalem to offer sacrifices, the people’s heart will turn back again to their lord, Rehoboam king of Judah, and they will put me to death.’ So the king thought this over and then made two golden calves; he said to the people, ‘You have been going up to Jerusalem long enough. Here are your gods, Israel; these brought you up out of the land of Egypt!’ He set up one in Bethel and the people went in procession all the way to Dan in front of the other. He set up the temple of the high places and appointed priests from ordinary families, who were not of the sons of Levi. Jeroboam also instituted a feast in the eighth month, on the fifteenth of the month, like the feast that was kept in Judah, and he went up to the altar. That was how he behaved in Bethel, sacrificing to the calves he had made; and at Bethel he put the priests of the high places he had established.

Jeroboam did not give up his wicked ways but went on appointing priests for the high places from the common people. He consecrated as priests of the high places any who wished to be. Such conduct made the House of Jeroboam a sinful House, and caused its ruin and extinction from the face of the earth.

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Mark 8:1-10

A great crowd had gathered, and they had nothing to eat. So Jesus called his disciples to him and said to them, ‘I feel sorry for all these people; they have been with me for three days now and have nothing to eat. If I send them off home hungry they will collapse on the way; some have come a great distance.’ His disciples replied, ‘Where could anyone get bread to feed these people in a deserted place like this?’ He asked them, ‘How many loaves have you?’ ‘Seven’ they said. Then he instructed the crowd to sit down on the ground, and he took the seven loaves, and after giving thanks he broke them and handed them to his disciples to distribute; and they distributed them among the crowd. They had a few small fish as well, and over these he said a blessing and ordered them to be distributed also. They ate as much as they wanted, and they collected seven basketfuls of the scraps left over. Now there had been about four thousand people. He sent them away and immediately, getting into the boat with his disciples, went to the region of Dalmanutha.

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I have compassion on the crowd

Jesus shares that this crowd has been with him for three days, so we know he must be exhausted and hungry. But his thoughts and motives aren’t for himself, they are for all those around him. He doesn’t say, ‘it’s not my problem, they should have brought their own food…’ or anything like that at all. His heart sees the people. He realizes they must be hungry and his strongest desire is to give to them. Even his disciples try to dissuade his compassion and generosity, but he is not deterred. Always thinking of others before himself, always loving all others all the time.

At a recent retreat, I was sharing with Brother Mark about a difficult person in my life. A person I love, but one who is constantly complaining, criticizing and gossiping. Her attitude and words make me want to just never spend time with her, and when I do, I want to point out her mean words and lack of gratitude for all those who are at her beck and call 24/7. My heart was filled with judgement on this person who I loved, but at this point didn’t like. I gave him many examples, and he agreed with me, then Brother Mark said, “ Yet, if you could see how much God loves her, it would break your heart.” Powerful words that immediately brought me to tears. Powerful words that demand – if I honestly want to be a disciple of Christ – for me to change MY perspective, my thoughts, my words so that I act with the LOVE of Christ, and not my flesh attitude of judgement.

I want to live a life of compassion for all those around me. Those I like and don’t like. The good, the bad and the ugly, knowing that I am all those things. If I have strength in compassion in the way that I live, I know Christ will be reflected. Most everyone I come into contact quickly realizes that I am a ‘Jesus’ person, and if we spend more than a handful of minutes together, they will know that I am Catholic. I want to be available for God to use me as He chooses, and I know that when I act in love, I honor him.

My heart’s desire is to do things well to honor God. All things. I will begin anew today.

(Today’s Oxygen by Gina Ulicny)

Prayer: Father God, open our eyes so that we truly see all those You have put in our path, and in seeing, are able to be Christ for them.

Thanksgiving: Father God, thank you for the compassion you have for each of us every second of our lives. Thank you for loving us through all our phases, failings and sinful acts. Thank you for your compassionate mercy, grace, forgiveness and perfect love.