Tag Archives: beatitudes

11 June, Monday – Peacemakers

Jun 11 – Feast of St. Barnabas, apostle

St. Barnabas (martyred 61) founded the Church in Antioch. He was a Levite Jewish convert, coming to the faith soon after Pentecost. Barnabas is mentioned frequently in the Acts of the Apostles, and is included among the prophets and doctors at Antioch. Like Paul, Barnabas believed in the Church’s mission to Gentiles, and worked with him in Cyprus and Asia, but split with him over a non-theological matter. At the time of his death, he was carrying a copy of the Gospel of Saint Matthew that he had copied by hand.

  • – Patron Saint Index

_____________________

Acts 11:21-26,13:1-3

A great number believed and were converted to the Lord.

The church in Jerusalem heard about this and they sent Barnabas to Antioch. There he could see for himself that God had given grace, and this pleased him, and he urged them all to remain faithful to the Lord with heartfelt devotion; for he was a good man, filled with the Holy Spirit and with faith. And a large number of people were won over to the Lord.

Barnabas then left for Tarsus to look for Saul, and when he found him he brought him to Antioch. As things turned out they were to live together in that church a whole year, instructing a large number of people. It was at Antioch that the disciples were first called ‘Christians.’

In the church at Antioch the following were prophets and teachers: Barnabas, Simeon called Niger, and Lucius of Cyrene, Manaen, who had been brought up with Herod the tetrarch, and Saul. One day while they were offering worship to the Lord and keeping a fast, the Holy Spirit said, ‘I want Barnabas and Saul set apart for the work to which I have called them.’ So it was that after fasting and prayer they laid their hands on them and sent them off.

_____________________

Matthew 5:1-12

Seeing the crowds, Jesus went up the hill. There he sat down and was joined by his disciples. Then he began to speak. This is what he taught them:

‘How happy are the poor in spirit;
theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
Happy the gentle:
they shall have the earth for their heritage.
Happy those who mourn:
they shall be comforted.
Happy those who hunger and thirst for what is right:
they shall be satisfied.
Happy the merciful:
they shall have mercy shown them.
Happy the pure in heart:
they shall see God.
Happy the peacemakers:
they shall be called sons of God.
Happy those who are persecuted in the cause of right:
theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

‘Happy are you when people abuse you and persecute you and speak all kinds of calumny against you on my account. Rejoice and be glad, for your reward will be great in heaven: this is how they persecuted the prophets before you.’

_____________________

“Blessed are the peacemakers, for they will be called children of God.”

When I was younger, I used to attend Sunday school and we were tasked to memorize verses as part of our homework. I used to take pride in being able to memorize the Beatitudes, but I never took the time to really meditate and understand what the Beatitudes were about. I knew that the Latin noun of the word Beatitude was used to describe a state of blessedness, but I never understood these eight Beatitudes using my heart. Recently, I had a conversation with a friend and she mentioned that she had a t-shirt with a very cool-looking dog decked in a pair of sunglasses with the phrase “Be attitude”. At that moment, I started to realize that the Beatitudes were more than just blessings spoken by Jesus, but they are the attitudes that He wanted us to have, and although these attitudes are not easy to embrace, through God’s grace, it is possible.

The past month has been extremely rough for me emotionally, because I have decided to leave my first job after close to 7 years; not because I became bored of the nature of the work, but because I started to succumb to the negativity of the office environment. I loved my job, and I still do, which was why the decision to resign was a struggle for me; but for my own mental and emotional well-being, I decided that it was best that I resign. My boss called me silly for leaving right before the bonus month, but my happiness was more important and I knew I could no longer feel happy working in this job. A few days after my resignation, I chanced upon the Beatitudes and the particular Beatitude – Blessed are the peacemakers, they will be called children of God – struck a chord in me. I decided to embark on a personal project to connect with people who I was avoiding at work, and to make peace with them before my last day. I guess God knew it was not an easy task for me, and he has been creating opportunities for me to ‘bump’ into these people, and through a brief conversation, make peace with them.

Brothers and sisters, as today is the memorial of Saint Barnabas, the patron saint of peacemakers, let us also take this chance to make peace with someone in our lives who God has been trying to lead us to. We, together with our brethren, are God’s beloved children, and He would want nothing but the best for us. Let us be the peacemakers in the lives of those around us, and with great faith, make an impact in this chaotic and conflicting world.

(Today’s Oxygen by Hannah Huang)

Prayer: Heavenly Father, we pray for the desire to reflect upon these eight Beatitudes and to give us the grace to emulate them through our daily living.

Thanksgiving: Dearest Father, we thank you for giving us the opportunity and humility to be peacemakers in the lives of those around us. Thank you for reminding us that despite all that we have done, we are Your children, and as Your children, we need to continually love one another.

2 July, Sunday – Love Unveiling

2 July 2017

_________________

2 Kings 4:8-11, 13-16

One day as Elisha was on his way to Shunem, a woman of rank who lived there pressed him to stay and eat there. After this he always broke his journey for a meal when he passed that way. She said to her husband, ‘Look, I am sure the man wno is constantly passing our way must be a holy man of God. Let us build him a small room on the roof, and put him a bed in it, and a table and chair and lamp; whenever he comes to us he can rest there.’ One day when he came, he retired to the upper room and lay down. He said to his servant Gehazi, ‘Call our Shunammitess. Tell her this: “Look, you have gone to all this trouble for us, what can we do for you? Is there anything you would like said for you to the king or to the commander of the army?”’ But she replied, ‘I live with my own people about me.’ ‘What can be done for her then?’ he asked. Gehazi answered, ‘Well, she has no son and her husband is old.’ Elisha said, ‘Call her.’ The servant called her and she stood at the door. This time next year,’ he said ‘you will hold a son in your arms.’

___________________

Romans 6:3-4, 8-11

When we were baptised in Christ Jesus we were baptised in his death; in other words, when we were baptised we went into the tomb with him and joined him in death, so that as Christ was raised from the dead by the Father’s glory, we too might live a new life.

But we believe that having died with Christ we shall return to life with him: Christ, as we know, having been raised from the dead will never die again. Death has no power over him any more. When he died, he died, once for all, to sin, so his life now is life with God; and in that way, you too must consider yourselves to be dead to sin but alive for God in Christ Jesus.

__________________

Matthew 10:37-42

Jesus instructed the Twelve as follows: ‘Anyone who prefers father or mother to me is not worthy of me. Anyone who prefers son or daughter to me is not worthy of me. Anyone who does not take his cross and follow in my footsteps is not worthy of me. Anyone who finds his life will lose it; anyone who loses his life for my sake will find it.

‘Anyone who welcomes you welcomes me; and those who welcome me welcome the one who sent me.

‘Anyone who welcomes a prophet will have a prophet’s reward; and anyone who welcomes a holy man will have a holy man’s reward.

‘If anyone gives so much as a cup of cold water to one of these little ones because he is a disciple, then I tell you solemnly, he will most certainly not lose his reward.’

____________________

Can something be done for her

In today’s reading, we hear of the woman without a child. In the times of Elisha and even in modern day Malaysia, women are expected to be life-giving by having their own offsprings. Society is rather unforgiving of this and some may utter hurtful words to ladies who do not have children.

God’s favour comes upon the lady in today’s gospel in the form of a son. But that need not be the only way God chooses to bless us – through children. Are we rooted enough to see all His works in our life? Are we able to look beyond the murmuring of people and trust in our Lord?

In the gospel, He clearly says that we are not worthy of Him if we love our children or parents more. This is a tough one for me as I simply adore my parents. Yet I know that God is my primary Father and He is my all in all. In matters of giving him a first class place in my heart, I have to rely on Him; there is no other way.

Recently, there was a brutal murder of a young man in Malaysia. He was 19 and was tortured for hours by his peers. There had been other such cases recently — young people being bullied to death by people they knew. As the investigations unfolded, it was revealed that these children had been bullied before by the same assilants and even other adults knew about it. Why did the other adults not speak up? This could have saved lives. Sadly, many people I spoke with on this admitted that they would not do anything if they saw a child being bullied, simply because the child was not their own.

Children are a gift from God. As adults, we have a duty of care towards any child, even strangers. If people loved God more than they loved their own children, they would have done or said something. Because they would have seen God in the child that was being bullied. The Beautitudes state – “blessed are the meek, they shall inherit the earth.”

My dear sisters and brothers, let us learn to talk when it matters and when it really counts, knowing that, that will not make us empty vessels but rather ones that love God more than we love anyone else. This world desperately needs to see the love of Christ through our words and deeds.

(Today’s Oxygen by Josephine Dionisappu)

Prayer: Lord, we pray for the victims and assailants in the recent bullying cases, also those who have chosen not to act. Be our voice and protector of all danger. St Michael the Archangel, pray for us.

Thanksgiving: We thank you Lord, for giving us a longing so deep so that we cannot ignore you, the Love or all Loves, you who are Love.

6 June, Monday – Willing Suspension of Disbelief

6 June – Memorial for St. Norbert, bishop, religious founder

St. Norbert (1080-1134) had been born to the nobility and raised around the royal court. There he developed a very worldly view, taking holy orders as a career move when he joined the Benedictines. A narrow escape from death led him to a conversion experience, and taking his vows seriously.

He founded a community of Augustinian canons, starting a reform movement that swept through European monastic houses. St. Norbert also reformed the clergy in his see, using force when necessary. He worked with St. Bernard of Clairvaux and St. Hugh of Grenoble to heal the schism caused by the death of Pope Honorius II, and for heresy in Cambrai, France with the help of St. Waltmann. He is one of the patron saints of peace.

-Patron Saint Index

_____________________

1 Kings 17:1-6

Elijah the Tishbite, of Tishbe in Gilead, said to Ahab, ‘As the Lord lives, the God of Israel whom I serve, there shall be neither dew nor rain these years except at my order.’
The word of the Lord came to him, ‘Go away from here, go eastwards, and hide yourself in the wadi Cherith which lies east of Jordan. You can drink from the stream, and I have ordered the ravens to bring you food there.’ He did as the Lord had said; he went and stayed in the wadi Cherith which lies east of Jordan. The ravens brought him bread in the morning and meat in the evening, and he quenched his thirst at the stream.

_____________________

Matthew 5:1-12

Seeing the crowds, Jesus went up the hill. There he sat down and was joined by his disciples. Then he began to speak. This is what he taught them:

‘How happy are the poor in spirit;
theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
Happy the gentle:
they shall have the earth for their heritage.
Happy those who mourn:
they shall be comforted.
Happy those who hunger and thirst for what is right:
they shall be satisfied.
Happy the merciful:
they shall have mercy shown them.
Happy the pure in heart:
they shall see God.
Happy the peacemakers:
they shall be called sons of God.
Happy those who are persecuted in the cause of right:
theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

‘Happy are you when people abuse you and persecute you and speak all kinds of calumny against you on my account. Rejoice and be glad, for your reward will be great in heaven: this is how they persecuted the prophets before you.’

_____________________

Blessed are the poor in spirit for theirs is the kingdom of heaven

Yesterday we talked about conversion. Upon re-reading my entry, it occurred to me that I might have given the impression that conversions happen instantaneously. They do not. The saying, ‘All in God’s time’ really is true. Some conversions take years, with hard edges smoothed out like patient water on rock. And the process of change doesn’t begin to happen until we give ourselves over to God. That’s essentially the Beautitudes’ cornerstone message, “blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the Kingdom of heaven”.

What does it mean to be “poor in spirit”? Jesus doesn’t say that the poor are especially blessed, nor does he equate being ‘poor in spirit’ to material poverty. The first reading from 1 Kings 17 offers a dramatic visual. We see Elijah the prophet, humble in obedience, relying only on a stream and the pickings of ravens for his sustenance. Being ‘poor in spirit’ is an attitude, a state of mind where we acknowledge our dependence on Him, and relinquish control of our common sense, giving ourselves to God. Can one be wealthy and still be ‘poor in spirit’? Yes, if we can recognize that our wealth is impermanent, transient in its quality. Can we be comfortable and still ‘poor in spirit’? Probably not because being comfortable implies a lack of struggle, and without struggle, there is no finding God.

At this point, some of us will be saying ‘Yes, well you can’t take everything literally in the Bible. How can a man survive on grubs and worms brought to him by ravens? That makes no sense!’ We will never be able to prove with confidence that Elijah really survived on bird food, but while the Bible may not be all fact, it IS all truth. We will never be ‘poor in spirit’ until we give ourselves over to God and realize that we are nothing without Him. Recognizing that our efforts are futile, that our ambitions are worthless without His grace, is the first step. So is the ‘willing suspension of (our) disbelief’. The Beautitudes are an affront to modern sensibilities. And that’s just the thing. God wants us to suspend ourselves, our wills, our thoughts and like Elijah, give it all over to Him. Can we do it? “The Lord will guard your coming and your going, both now and forever” (Psalms 121:8).

(Today’s Oxygen by Sharon Soo)

Prayer: We pray for the awareness to recognize that not everything that happens needs to be about us. We pray for the humility to give ourselves over to God.

Thanksgiving: We give thanks for those whom He sends to aid us when we fully depend on Him. We give thanks for the opportunities that He provides us to do the same in return.