Tag Archives: gratitude

3 April, Friday – At Your Service

3 April 2020

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Jeremiah 20:10-13

Jeremiah said:

I hear so many disparaging me,
‘“Terror from every side!”
Denounce him! Let us denounce him!’
All those who used to be my friends
watched for my downfall,
‘Perhaps he will be seduced into error.
Then we will master him
and take our revenge!’
But the Lord is at my side, a mighty hero;
my opponents will stumble, mastered,
confounded by their failure;
everlasting, unforgettable disgrace will be theirs.
But you, O Lord of Hosts, you who probe with justice,
who scrutinise the loins and heart,
let me see the vengeance you will take on them,
for I have committed my cause to you.
Sing to the Lord,
praise the Lord,
for he has delivered the soul of the needy
from the hands of evil men.

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John 10:31-42

The Jews fetched stones to stone him, so Jesus said to them, ‘I have done many good works for you to see, works from my Father; for which of these are you stoning me?’ The Jews answered him, ‘We are not stoning you for doing a good work but for blasphemy: you are only a man and you claim to be God.’ Jesus answered:

‘Is it not written in your Law:
I said, you are gods?
So the Law uses the word gods
of those to whom the word of God was addressed,
and scripture cannot be rejected.
Yet you say to someone the Father has consecrated and sent into the world,
“You are blaspheming,”
because he says, “I am the son of God.”
If I am not doing my Father’s work,
there is no need to believe me;
but if I am doing it,
then even if you refuse to believe in me,
at least believe in the work I do;
then you will know for sure

that the Father is in me and I am in the Father.’

They wanted to arrest him then, but he eluded them.

He went back again to the far side of the Jordan to stay in the district where John had once been baptising. Many people who came to him there said, ‘John gave no signs, but all he said about this man was true’; and many of them believed in him.

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At least believe in the work I do; then you will know for sure that the Father is in me and I am in the Father

Amid our current pandemic situation, if someone does good deeds, others will comment that it is hypocrisy. If someone shows indifference, others will comment that they are worthless. It is true that we cannot please everybody. Our life must not be dependent on the appreciation of others. But we are working like that. We show up to work on time to let the people know we are responsible. We submit efficient works to let others know that we are reliable. Now that we are on quarantine, we try to do as much housework or ‘work from home’ tasks as we can to let others know we are dependable. We do things to please other people. But it is not how it should be. Yes, it is very impressive that we are capable of doing great things. But can we just be alright with just ‘doing great things’ and remove the part ‘to let others know’?

As Catholics and believers of Christ, we wholeheartedly do our best to follow Christ and live His word. Easier said and done, because our modernity is a source of increasing temptation that leads us to stray away from Christ.

Let us ask ourselves, “Should we wait for our deathbed before we want to do good deeds or ask for forgiveness?” Some of us are on quarantine and most of us are living with our families. Let us take this as an opportunity to converse with them. Let us put our phones down and have a decent meal together. Yes, we need our phones to be updated on the latest events. But it can wait. Use the social distancing time to ‘re-learn’ about your family members. We may realize that our family members have changed or there could be the ‘aha’ moment when we realize that it seems it is only now that we get to know them better. Talk to them about anything. It is a simple way of reaching out to them. Some of them might not like the idea of being inside the house for the time being. Let them feel at ease because they are with their family. They are your family, you know them best. In that way, we are being used as tools in sharing the good works of Christ.

(Today’s Oxygen by Beryl Baterina)

Prayer: Father God, please grant us the grace to see the goodness in others and to show goodness as well. Amen.

Thanksgiving:  Thank you Father God, for the people who heed the call to be of service during this COVID-19 pandemic.  Amen.

25 December, Wednesday (Mass in the Day) – In Search of…

25 December – Solemnity of the Nativity of our Lord (Mass in the Day)

The Word Made Flesh

For us the Word of God is no longer the message spoken by prophets, but the messenger of God in person, the Eternal Word begotten of the Father before time began. 

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Isaiah 52:7-10

How beautiful on the mountains,
are the feet of one who brings good news,
who heralds peace, brings happiness,
proclaims salvation,
and tells Zion,
‘Your God is king!’

Listen! Your watchmen raise their voices,
they shout for joy together,
for they see the Lord face to face,
as he returns to Zion.

Break into shouts of joy together,
you ruins of Jerusalem;
for the Lord is consoling his people,
redeeming Jerusalem.

The Lord bares his holy arm
in the sight of all the nations,
and all the ends of the earth shall see
the salvation of our God.

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Hebrews 1:1-6

At various times in the past and in various different ways, God spoke to our ancestors through the prophets; but in our own time, the last days, he has spoken to us through his Son, the Son that he has appointed to inherit everything and through whom he made everything there is. He is the radiant light of God’s glory and the perfect copy of his nature, sustaining the universe by his powerful command; and now that he has destroyed the defilement of sin, he has gone to take his place in heaven at the right hand of divine Majesty. So he is now as far above the angels as the title which he has inherited is higher than their own name.

God has never said to any angel: You are my Son, today I have become your father; or: I will be a father to him and he a son to me. Again, when he brings the First-born into the world, he says: Let all the angels of God worship him.

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John 1:1-18

In the beginning was the Word:
and the Word was with God
and the Word was God.
He was with God in the beginning.
Through him all things came to be,
not one thing had its being but through him.
All that came to be had life in him
and that life was the light of men,
a light that shines in the dark,
a light that darkness could not overpower.

A man came, sent by God.
His name was John.
He came as a witness,
as a witness to speak for the light,
so that everyone might believe through him.
He was not the light,
only a witness to speak for the light.

The Word was the true light
that enlightens all men;
and he was coming into the world.
He was in the world
that had its being through him,
and the world did not know him.
He came to his own domain
and his own people did not accept him.
But to all who did accept him
he gave power to become children of God,
to all who believe in the name of him
who was born not out of human stock
or urge of the flesh
or will of man
but of God himself.

The Word was made flesh,
he lived among us,
and we saw his glory,
the glory that is his as the only Son of the Father,
full of grace and truth.

John appears as his witness. He proclaims:
‘This is the one of whom I said:
He who comes after me ranks before me
because he existed before me.’

Indeed, from his fullness we have, all of us, received –
yes, grace in return for grace,
since, though the Law was given through Moses,
grace and truth have come through Jesus Christ.
No one has ever seen God;
it is the only Son, who is nearest to the Father’s heart,
who has made him known.

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And all the ends of the earth shall see the salvation of our God

I have just returned from a 12-day pilgrimage to the Holy Land and was blessed to have walked in the land where Jesus lived, preached, died and then rose and ascended into heaven. Celebrating daily mass at the many holy sites was truly all I wanted and, particularly so at the Holy Sepulchre (on Golgotha) and in a boat on the Sea of Galilee, I felt His presence strongly.

We also had an hour of adoration in front of the Blessed Sacrament one evening in the chapel within the convent where we were staying in Jerusalem and as I struggled to understand His supreme sacrifice (we had visited the home of Caiaphas and prayed Psalm 88 in the very dungeon Jesus spent the night before his crucifixion), I asked in my heart how is it that God would have put his only son through all that pain, torture and misery. I could only trust in faith that God’s divine plan would reveal His love and mercy to me along the way.

And so he did. In the various encounters I had with the shopowners in the Old City on our free half day, in the daily interactions with the pilgrims (some of whom I had met the previous year on a similar trip through France to Portugal), and in my dreams as I slumbered for at least 10 hours each night.

Because despite the conflict that I felt within the land, there was an unmistakeable aura – one that spoke of perserverance, of never giving up. One that radiate an ethereal peace, love and joy. Jesus was ever-present as we traced His footsteps, guided by our knowledgeable and grandfatherly guide, led by our slightly regimental but ever-loving tour leader. They brought to life each and every site as we took pictures, prayed and reflected. From the Church of the Visitation to the very spot where He gave up His sacred life, I could feel the sense of foreboding and inevitability of the fate our Saviour was meant to live out.

Yet amidst all this ‘heaviness’, I could also reflect back on the hope of His birth. We just had a small party at home and the choir came and sang familiar favourites. Those lyrics mean so much more to me now and as I look back on our pilgrimage, I praise God for calling me to His land – where conflict and tolerance are part and parcel of everyday life. Where walls are erected to demarcate governance and control. However, I know in my heart that these are mere symbols erected by man. We, brothers and sisters, are called to destroy all walls that we erect within our hearts; to embrace the poor, the afflicted, the downtrodden. Because the greatest gift we have been given was not under a tree. It was born in a manger, under a shining star so that we would embrace it and be shining stars wherever we walk.

(Today’s OXYGEN by Desmond Soon)

Prayer:  Father, we thank you for the gift of Jesus, our Emmanuel, your Holy Son.

Thanksgiving: Thank you Jesus, for being our shining star in our lives.

3 May, Friday – Knowing the Father

May 3 – Feast of Sts. Philip and James, Apostles

Philip was a disciple of St. John the Baptist, and a convert. He was one of the Twelve Apostles, and brought St. Nathanael to Christ. He was a confidant of Jesus’. Little is known about him, but scriptural episodes give the impression of a shy, naïve, but practical individual. He preached in Greece and Asia Minor, and died a martyr for the faith.

James the Lesser was the cousin of Jesus, and brother of St. Jude Thaddeus. He was raised in a Jewish home of the time with all the training in Scripture and Law that was part of that life. He was a convert, and one of the Twelve Apostles. He was one of the first to have visions of the risen Christ.

He was the first bishop of Jerusalem. He met with St. Paul the Apostle to work out Paul’s plans for evangelization. He supported the position that Gentile converts did not have to obey all Jewish religious law, though he continued to observe it himself as part of his heritage. He may have been a vegetarian. He was a just and apostolic man known for his prayer life and devotion to the poor.

He was martyred for his faith in c.62 when he was thrown from a pinnacle of the Temple in Jerusalem, and then stoned and beaten with clubs while praying for his attackers. Having been beaten to death, a club almost immediately became his symbol, leading to his patronage of fullers and pharmacists, both of whom use clubs in their professions.

He is reported to have spent so much time in prayer that his knees thickened, and looked like a camel’s. Soon after the Crucifixion, James said he would fast until Christ returned; the resurrected Jesus appeared to him, and fixed a meal for James Himself.

  • Patron Saint Index

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1 Corinthians 15:1-8

Brothers, I want to remind you of the gospel I preached to you, the gospel that you received and in which you are firmly established; because the gospel will save you only if you keep believing exactly what I preached to you – believing anything else will not lead to anything.

Well then, in the first place, I taught you what I had been taught myself, namely that Christ died for our sins, in accordance with the scriptures; that he was buried; and that he was raised to life on the third day, in accordance with the scriptures; that he appeared first to Cephas and secondly to the Twelve. Next he appeared to more than five hundred of the brothers at the same time, most of whom are still alive, though some have died; then he appeared to James, and then to all the apostles; and last of all he appeared to me too; it was as though I was born when no one expected it.

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John 14:6-14

Jesus said to Thomas:
‘I am the Way, the Truth and the Life.
No one can come to the Father except through me.
If you know me, you know my Father too.
From this moment you know him and have seen him.’

Philip said, ‘Lord, let us see the Father and then we shall be satisfied.’
‘Have I been with you all this time, Philip,’ said Jesus to him ‘and you still do not know me?

‘To have seen me is to have seen the Father,
so how can you say, “Let us see the Father”?
Do you not believe
that I am in the Father and the Father is in me?
The words I say to you I do not speak as from myself:
it is the Father, living in me, who is doing this work.
You must believe me when I say
that I am in the Father and the Father is in me;
believe it on the evidence of this work, if for no other reason.
I tell you most solemnly,
whoever believes in me
will perform the same works as I do myself,
he will perform even greater works,
because I am going to the Father.
Whatever you ask for in my name I will do,
so that the Father may be glorified in the Son.
If you ask for anything in my name,
I will do it.’

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It was as though I was born when no one expected it

 This particular Lenten season has been an unusual one for me in the sense that I have been swamped with ‘work’, not of the usual kind, but rather work in ministry. Getting a budget approved, having to rework the various quotes, being present for meetings and also supporting a weekend seminar by having to rally some members to help with AV support. Not to mention editing the many more readings that have come in – all that would have, in the past, floored me.

However, I found myself sharing with my discipleship group about how He has spoken so powerfully to me, encouraging me on. And being there for others (I even found time for a quick getaway with a close buddy for 6 days). During the past few weeks, I have grieved the loss of a colleague’s father who passed away suddenly, and also someone with one of the best voices around who tragically died from cancer, leaving behind two young children. There are also other personal burdens to shoulder, and ‘errands’ to run. Yet all this time, I have managed to find comfort and solace in His merciful love.

It was as if I finally learnt to appreciate Christ’s sacrifice for all humanity and to truly believe in His saving passion for ALL of us – yes, each and everyone of us who is hurting, grieving, complaining, searching for answers to our various predicaments. In coming to know Him more, He has rewarded me with gifts of people who have reached out in hope. A new opportunity to serve at an upcoming retreat for young adults, a new contributor to our incredible online ministry, a new chance to work with a group of members who are full of zeal. I even went to another parish for Good Friday service and discovered a new choir whose voices moved me to tears.

In almost every situation that would have brought despair, I have managed to find hope. Or rather, HE has shown me hope.

Indeed, through Jesus’ death and resurrection, we have all been born again. His death gives us hope; hope that through whatever darkness we are journeying, there is light at the end and in emerging into that light, we are created new.

Brothers and sisters, as Easter people, we believe that Christ is born again in our hearts each day we arise. Let us go forth in hope and spread that hope to others around us who live in despair.

(Today’s Oxygen by Desmond Soon)

Prayer: Dear Father, we pray that we take each day as an opportunity to spread your love and your Word to others around us.

Thanksgiving: Thank you Lord, for resurrecting hope in our hearts each and every day we celebrate the eucharist.

12 April, Friday – Praying through Pixels

12 April 2019

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Jeremiah 20:10-13

Jeremiah said:

I hear so many disparaging me,
‘“Terror from every side!”
Denounce him! Let us denounce him!’
All those who used to be my friends
watched for my downfall,
‘Perhaps he will be seduced into error.
Then we will master him
and take our revenge!’
But the Lord is at my side, a mighty hero;
my opponents will stumble, mastered,
confounded by their failure;
everlasting, unforgettable disgrace will be theirs.
But you, O Lord of Hosts, you who probe with justice,
who scrutinise the loins and heart,
let me see the vengeance you will take on them,
for I have committed my cause to you.
Sing to the Lord,
praise the Lord,
for he has delivered the soul of the needy
from the hands of evil men.

_______________________

John 10:31-42

The Jews fetched stones to stone him, so Jesus said to them, ‘I have done many good works for you to see, works from my Father; for which of these are you stoning me?’ The Jews answered him, ‘We are not stoning you for doing a good work but for blasphemy: you are only a man and you claim to be God.’ Jesus answered:

‘Is it not written in your Law:
I said, you are gods?
So the Law uses the word gods
of those to whom the word of God was addressed,
and scripture cannot be rejected.
Yet you say to someone the Father has consecrated and sent into the world,
“You are blaspheming,”
because he says, “I am the son of God.”
If I am not doing my Father’s work,
there is no need to believe me;
but if I am doing it,
then even if you refuse to believe in me,
at least believe in the work I do;
then you will know for sure
that the Father is in me and I am in the Father.’

They wanted to arrest him then, but he eluded them.

He went back again to the far side of the Jordan to stay in the district where John had once been baptising. Many people who came to him there said, ‘John gave no signs, but all he said about this man was true’; and many of them believed in him.

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Even if you refuse to believe in me, at least believe in the work I do

One trait which cuts across consistently throughout the public ministry of Jesus was the way in which those around him often were not able to see the truth of who He was. They were focused more on the superficial actions of what Jesus did and what he said. The Jewish people and their leaders could only interpret the actions and words of Jesus through the lens of Judaism – and from this lens, they were not able to accept the many revelations of God through Jesus sent to be the Messiah. It is through this lens that they could only see the miracles, especially those of healing and casting out of devils. They were also not able to accept the revelations of Jesus as the Son of God (which became only blasphemy), the Messiah sent to redeem the world (reducing him to just another prophet or the reincarnations of Moses or Elijah) or that their focus was on how Jesus desecrated the Sabbath rather than the revelation that mercy is what God’s love is all about, not rituals. Because they were unable to cast off the lens of Judaism, many of them were unable to let the light of truth penetrate and they remained in darkness, to be forever lost.

Many remain lost in that darkness through modern day lenses — materialism, humanism, or even through the viewpoint of Americanism which defines a great part of the evangelical Christian sects, so dominant in America, which are so vocal in the condemnation of God’s revelations through the Catholic faith. All of which does not allow the light of God’s revelations to shine through.

In the gospel, Jesus therefore makes a simple but succinct point. That if we cannot believe his words, then let his actions bring forth the revelations and lead us to the light.

We too often lose sight of the truth of God’s presence and intimacy in our lives — of His sovereignty, His power, His mercy, His blessing, His graces. When the storms of our lives blow hard and furious, when the desert of our lives make our faith dry and parched, when we are too busy being strangled in the thorn-bushes of worry and responsibilities of this world, we question God’s promises, His Will and His word. These too become our own lenses and they too are just as powerful in preventing God’s light and truth from penetrating into the reality of our lives.

In such times, let me suggest you do this – close your bible, keep your prayer cards, store away your spiritual readings. Then take out your phone and open up the gallery where you store all the photos contained therein. As you go through them, you will probably have captured photos from a myriad of events that have happened to you — celebrations marking family milestones, the birth of your child, a birthday, a wedding anniversary, your child’s first step or perhaps the wedding of one of your children, an unforgettable outing with your best pals, various events at church, a reunion with a special someone in your life, graduation of your child, perhaps your kid did great in school and got an award, a statue of your favorite saint you chanced upon, a promotion celebration for you in your office, an amazing sunset — and of course, all those wonderful memories of the family holidays you may have had.

Your memories tug at your heart and perhaps, you can reflect and come to realize just who made all those great memories and events in your life possible in the first place. God not only blessed you abundantly, He was also present with you at those great moments of your life. More importantly, you begin to see that indeed, God acted in your life. He worked in your life to bring you providence, achievement, joy, fulfillment, growth, peace, hope.

Sometimes, he even made miracles happen just for you.

(Today’s OXYGEN by Justus Teo)

Prayer: Father help us. We forget easily. We doubt all the time. When your will differs from ours, when we feel the weight of the cross, when the bright lights and glitz of this world beckon, we doubt. We forget who you are — Almighty God, faithful friend and brother. Instead, we see you as weak, indifferent, distant, unattainable, often, we don’t see you at all. Help us to break through the lens of our preconceived notions, of our stubborn habits, of our unbending minds and wills.

Thanksgiving: Father, thank you for showing us once again, who you really are and where you have always been. Thank you for bringing the light of your truth to pierce through the deepest darkness of our hearts and helping us shatter the lenses that keep us in bondage to our sins, our doubts and which stops us from reaching you. Our Almighty God, our friend and brother who never left our side. Not for even one second.

18 July, Tuesday – Focussing our eyes on God

18 July

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Exodus 2:1-15

There was a man of the tribe of Levi who had taken a woman of Levi as his wife. She conceived and gave birth to a son and, seeing what a fine child he was, she kept him hidden for three months. When she could hide him no longer, she got a papyrus basket for him; coating it with bitumen and pitch, she put the child inside and laid it among the reeds at the river’s edge. His sister stood some distance away to see what would happen to him.

Now Pharaoh’s daughter went down to bathe in the river, and the girls attending her were walking along by the riverside. Among the reeds she noticed the basket, and she sent her maid to fetch it. She opened it and looked, and saw a baby boy, crying; and she was sorry for him. ‘This is a child of one of the Hebrews’ she said. Then the child’s sister said to Pharaoh’s daughter, ‘Shall I go and find you a nurse among the Hebrew women to suckle the child for you?’ ‘Yes, go’ Pharaoh’s daughter said to her; and the girl went off to find the baby’s own mother. To her the daughter of Pharaoh said, ‘Take this child away and suckle it for me. I will see you are paid.’ So the woman took the child and suckled it. When the child grew up, she brought him to Pharaoh’s daughter who treated him like a son; she named him Moses because, she said, ‘I drew him out of the water.’

Moses, a man by now, set out at this time to visit his countrymen, and he saw what a hard life they were having; and he saw an Egyptian strike a Hebrew, one of his countrymen. Looking round he could see no one in sight, so he killed the Egyptian and hid him in the sand. On the following day he came back, and there were two Hebrews, fighting. He said to the man who was in the wrong, ‘What do you mean by hitting your fellow countryman?’ ‘And who appointed you’ the man retorted, ‘to be prince over us, and judge? Do you intend to kill me as you killed the Egyptian?’ Moses was frightened. ‘Clearly that business has come to light’ he thought. When Pharaoh heard of the matter he would have killed Moses, but Moses fled from Pharaoh and made for the land of Midian.

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Matthew 11:20-24

Jesus began to reproach the towns in which most of his miracles had been worked, because they refused to repent.

‘Alas for you, Chorazin! Alas for you, Bethsaida! For if the miracles done in you had been done in Tyre and Sidon, they would have repented long ago in sackcloth and ashes. And still, I tell you that it will not go as hard on Judgement day with Tyre and Sidon as with you. And as for you, Capernaum, did you want to be exalted as high as heaven? You shall be thrown down to hell. For if the miracles done in you had been done in Sodom, it would have been standing yet. And still, I tell you that it will not go as hard with the land of Sodom on Judgement day as with you.’

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“For if the miracles done in you had been done in Tyre and Sidon, they would have repented long ago.”

I love watching movies and one of the most common themes is the love between a man and a woman. One of my favourite movies is ‘50 First Dates’, which starred Adam Sandler and Drew Barrymore.

(Warning : Spoilers Ahead)

Because the female protagonist is an amnesiac, the male protagonist finds that he has got to start over every day, getting the girl to reacquaint herself with him. More importantly, he has got to demonstrate his love for her on a daily basis, and to get her to fall in love with him all over again. Amazingly, he never gets tired of doing this. If anything, his love for her seems to grow stronger over time.

In the Old Testament, we read about how God repeatedly shows His protection for the Israelites. In fact, immediately after leaving Egypt in Exodus 14 (through the parted Red Sea), God cared for and provided for His people. He fed them with manna and quail. All these signs were clear and evident to the Jews.

Despite this constant demonstration by God of His love for them, the Israelites, by Exodus 32, had smelted their gold and built a gold calf for worship!

The reason for this was because the Israelites only cared for themselves. In Egypt, they complained about their cruel Egyptian overloads. When crossing the desert, they complained about being hungry and expressed regrets about leaving Egypt in the first place. Such ingratitude!

In the Gospel of today, the Lord reminds us to always be grateful. In order to recognise the wonders that God does for us, we need to look without instead of within. Such a strong reminder to keep our eyes on God!

(Today’s Oxygen by Paul Wee)

Prayer Father God, let us never be blind to the miracles that You perform in our lives on a daily basis. Help us never to be so blasé that we dwell in the blessings of Your love.

Thanksgiving We are grateful for the Holy Trinity. Thank You for Your presence in our lives and for the Your involvement in our lives.

26 October, Wednesday – The Narrow Gate

26 October

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Ephesians 6:1-9

Children, be obedient to your parents in the Lord – that is your duty. The commandment that has a promise attached to it is: Honour your father and mother, and the promise is: and you will prosper and have a long life in the land. And parents, never drive your children to resentment but in bringing them up correct them and guide them as the Lord does.

Slaves, be obedient to the men who are called your masters in this world, with deep respect and sincere loyalty, as you are obedient to Christ: not only when you are under their eye, as if you had only to please men, but because you are slaves of Christ and wholeheartedly do the will of God. Work hard and willingly, but do it for the sake of the Lord and not for the sake of men. You can be sure that everyone, whether a slave or a free man, will be properly rewarded by the Lord for whatever work he has done well. And those of you who are employers, treat your slaves in the same spirit; do without threats, remembering that they and you have the same Master in heaven and he is not impressed by one person more than by another.

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Luke 13:22-30

Through towns and villages Jesus went teaching, making his way to Jerusalem. Someone said to him, ‘Sir, will there be only a few saved?’ He said to them, ‘Try your best to enter by the narrow door, because, I tell you, many will try to enter and will not succeed.

‘Once the master of the house has got up and locked the door, you may find yourself knocking on the door, saying, “Lord, open to us” but he will answer, “I do not know where you come from.” Then you will find yourself saying, “We once ate and drank in your company; you taught in our streets” but he will reply, “I do not know where you come from. Away from me, all you wicked men!”

‘Then there will be weeping and grinding of teeth, when you see Abraham and Isaac and Jacob and all the prophets in the kingdom of God, and yourselves turned outside. And men from east and west, from north and south, will come to take their places at the feast in the kingdom of God.

‘Yes, there are those now last who will be first, and those now first who will be last.’

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Honour your father and mother …

“When I was a child, I spoke as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child: but when I became a man, I put away childish things” (1 Cor 13:11). There comes a time in every child’s life when she realizes that she has outgrown her parents and must soon assume the role of their caregiver and steward. Whether through illness, death, divorce or simply the passage of time, it’s an inevitable reversal of roles that happens to all of us. Old age is spiteful. It robs our parents of their human dignity, of their self-respect. It takes their health and their minds, and all we can do is watch them retreat until they’re but a reflection through a glass darkly.

In a reduced state, people say and do things that are hurtful. It’s as if they lose their inhibitions and revert to child-like versions of themselves. The gospel says to us, “Strive to enter through the narrow gate, for many will attempt to enter but will not be strong enough” (Luke 13:24). Well, the ‘narrow gate’ is when someone you love turns on you despite all your efforts to love them and make things easier for them. Those who most need to be helped are often the ones who refuse it most viciously. The easy thing to do is to walk away, to give up because we feel unappreciated, insulted, unloved. Yet Christ loved us despite our ingratitude, our insults and our attacks on him. And he asked forgiveness for us with his dying breath. The greatest act of love you can perform, that which is most Christ-like, is to love someone and to persevere in your efforts to love them, despite their ingratitude. Christ paved the way for all believers when he did it for us. He was the perfect embodiment of love for us, because despite our efforts to push him away, he remained faithful to us.

One day, we too will lose ourselves – to illness, or dementia, or early on-set Alzheimer’s. We might have a stroke and find that suddenly we’ve lost our motor skills. We could be struck down by cancer, and be so pumped full of morphine that we’re too dazed to realize who or what we’re about. Old age is cruel and it comes for everyone. The narrow gate is to love those who are hard to love because one day, we too will become hard to be around. And then, we pray for the blessing of those who are not afraid to love us despite ourselves.

(Today’s Oxygen by Sharon Soo)

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Prayer: We pray for all caregivers, those who persevere on despite the ingratitude of those whom they love. We pray for them to find strength in His grace.

Thanksgiving: We give thanks for those who are caregivers and stewards, who love us despite ourselves.