Tag Archives: rebecca grace

31 March, Saturday – Easter Vigil

31 March – Easter Vigil 

Dear Readers,

The Easter Vigil Mass features a total of nine readings. It is an Oxygen tradition to have a reflection for each of these readings. This Easter, together with our regular contributors, we welcome back Steven and Rebecca, as well as guest contributor Kristel. It is a long read, but we hope that it will be an enjoyable and inspiring one!

Blessed Easter!
Desmond (on behalf of the Oxygen Team)
_____________________

FIRST READING

Genesis 1:1-2:2

In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. Now the earth was a formless void, there was darkness over the deep, and God’s spirit hovered over the water.

God said, ‘Let there be light’, and there was light. God saw that light was good, and God divided light from darkness. God called light ‘day’, and darkness he called ‘night.’ Evening came and morning came: the first day.

God said, ‘Let there be a vault in the waters to divide the waters in two.’ And so it was. God made the vault, and it divided the waters above the vault from the waters under the vault. God called the vault ‘heaven.’ Evening came and morning came: the second day.

God said, ‘Let the waters under heaven come together into a single mass, and let dry land appear.’ And so it was. God called the dry land ‘earth’ and the mass of waters ‘seas’, and God saw that it was good.

God said, ‘Let the earth produce vegetation: seed-bearing plants, and fruit trees bearing fruit with their seed inside, on the earth.’ And so it was. The earth produced vegetation: plants bearing seed in their several kinds, and trees bearing fruit with their seed inside in their several kinds. God saw that it was good. Evening came and morning came: the third day.

God said, ‘Let there be lights in the vault of heaven to divide day from night, and let them indicate festivals, days and years. Let them be lights in the vault of heaven to shine on the earth.’ And so it was. God made the two great lights: the greater light to govern the day, the smaller light to govern the night, and the stars. God set them in the vault of heaven to shine on the earth, to govern the day and the night and to divide light from darkness. God saw that it was good. Evening came and morning came: the fourth day.

God said, ‘Let the waters teem with living creatures, and let birds fly above the earth within the vault of heaven.’ And so it was. God created great sea-serpents and every kind of living creature with which the waters teem, and every kind of winged creature. God saw that it was good. God blessed them, saying, ‘Be fruitful, multiply, and fill the waters of the seas; and let the birds multiply upon the earth.’ Evening came and morning came: the fifth day.

God said, ‘Let the earth produce every kind of living creature: cattle, reptiles, and every kind of wild beast.’ And so it was. God made every kind of wild beast, every kind of cattle, and every kind of land reptile. God saw that it was good.

God said, ‘Let us make man in our own image, in the likeness of ourselves, and let them be masters of the fish of the sea, the birds of heaven, the cattle, all the wild beasts and all the reptiles that crawl upon the earth.’

God created man in the image of himself,
in the image of God he created him,
male and female he created them.

God blessed them, saying to them, ‘Be fruitful, multiply, fill the earth and conquer it. Be masters of the fish of the sea, the birds of heaven and all living animals on the earth.’ God said, ‘See, I give you all the seed-bearing plants that are upon the whole earth, and all the trees with seed-bearing fruit; this shall be your food. To all wild beasts, all birds of heaven and all living reptiles on the earth I give all the foliage of plants for food.’ And so it was. God saw all he had made, and indeed it was very good. Evening came and morning came: the sixth day.

Thus heaven and earth were completed with all their array. On the seventh day God completed the work he had been doing. He rested on the seventh day after all the work he had been doing.
________________

Responsorial Psalm 103:1-2,5-6,10,12-14,24,35

R/: Send forth your spirit, O Lord, and renew the face of the earth.
________________

God’s Creations

How many are your works, O Lord! In wisdom you have made them all.

The first reading brings us back to the beginning of time, how God created the world out of nothing. For me, being in nature is one of the most basic, yet greatest reminders of God’s amazing creation.

I had the opportunity to climb Mount Rinjani a couple years ago. It is known to be a difficult hike, but one that is well-rewarded with beautiful views. I thought I had trained hard and prepared well for it, but we cannot always predict and plan everything to the detail; especially when dealing with the elements, we just have to go with the flow and adapt to the best of our abilities, and trust in God’s plan.

It was a very humbling but edifying experience for me. I was one with nature during that 3-day hike – camping outdoors, no toilets nor showers, no electricity. Amidst all that simplicity, you learn to appreciate the little things even more. The guides and porters whose livelihoods depend on this mountain were like superheroes to me. Their loads and responsibilities were far greater than ours, yet they carried it all so effortlessly. They were completely selfless and generous, and their primary concern was just making sure we were well taken care of, and helping us reach the summit.

By God’s grace, I made it to the top. Standing at 3,726 metres, my breath was taken away by the sheer beauty of this mountain. Basking in all that glorious majesticness, you can only marvel at how amazing God’s creation is. This was 100 per cent nature, nothing man-made about it. I was completely overwhelmed and filled with wonderment and gratitude.

But I had also struggled a lot, especially while trying to summit; without the help of these guides I probably might not have made it. At one part of the journey, one of them saw I was shivering and took off his jacket for me, leaving himself with just a thin long-sleeved shirt and a blanket in the freezing temperatures. He had selflessly insisted, “If you are okay, then I am okay.” These are moments when I see Jesus in people, and a great lesson for me to try and be like Jesus to others too.

The beauty that surrounded me in the mountains was not just in the amazing views, but also in the people. This is exactly God’s creation, the earth and mankind. I was initially worried that I was not prepared enough for the hike or that I was not fit enough, but God had sent me these angels to guide me and carry me. We often fear that we are not good enough. But we are God’s creation, and He has a plan set out for each and every one of us. We just have to trust in Him. And no matter what, we are always enough for God.

(Today’s Oxygen by Kristel Wang)

Prayer: Heavenly Father, we pray that we will grow in faith and learn to place our trust in You. We pray that we will always be appreciative of all the little things, and never take anything for granted.

Thanksgiving: Dear Lord, thank you for all your wondrous creations, the beautiful earth and all its creatures you have entrusted unto us.

________________

SECOND READING

Genesis 22:1-18

God put Abraham to the test. ‘Abraham, Abraham’ he called. ‘Here I am’ he replied. ‘Take your son,’ God said ‘your only child Isaac, whom you love, and go to the land of Moriah. There you shall offer him as a burnt offering, on a mountain I will point out to you.’

Rising early next morning Abraham saddled his ass and took with him two of his servants and his son Isaac. He chopped wood for the burnt offering and started on his journey to the place God had pointed out to him. On the third day Abraham looked up and saw the place in the distance. Then Abraham said to his servants, ‘Stay here with the donkey. The boy and I will go over there; we will worship and come back to you.’

Abraham took the wood for the burnt offering, loaded it on Isaac, and carried in his own hands the fire and the knife. Then the two of them set out together. Isaac spoke to his father Abraham, ‘Father’ he said. ‘Yes, my son’ he replied. ‘Look,’ he said ‘here are the fire and the wood, but where is the lamb for the burnt offering?’ Abraham answered, ‘My son, God himself will provide the lamb for the burnt offering.’ Then the two of them went on together.

When they arrived at the place God had pointed out to him, Abraham built an altar there, and arranged the wood. Then he bound his son Isaac and put him on the altar on top of the wood. Abraham stretched out his hand and seized the knife to kill his son.

But the angel of the Lord called to him from heaven. ‘Abraham, Abraham’ he said. ‘I am here’ he replied. ‘Do not raise your hand against the boy’ the angel said. ‘Do not harm him, for now I know you fear God. You have not refused me your son, your only son.’ Then looking up, Abraham saw a ram caught by its horns in a bush. Abraham took the ram and offered it as a burnt-offering in place of his son.

Abraham called this place ‘The Lord Provides’, and hence the saying today: On the mountain the Lord provides.

The angel of the Lord called Abraham a second time from heaven. ‘I swear by my own self – it is the Lord who speaks – because you have done this, because you have not refused me your son, your only son, I will shower blessings on you, I will make your descendants as many as the stars of heaven and the grains of sand on the seashore. Your descendants shall gain possession of the gates of their enemies. All the nations of the earth shall bless themselves by your descendants, as a reward for your obedience.’
________________

Responsorial Psalm 15:5,8-11

R/: Preserve me, God, I take refuge in you.
________________

Journey Mercies

“I keep my eyes always on the Lord. With him at my right hand, I will not be shaken.”

We will never understand God’s ways. I was on a snowboarding trip recently and was riding really well. Really well until I attempted to jump off a ramp and sufferred a nasty fall which kept me out of action for the next few days. That was the first time that I had ever gotten injured; I had made it through National Service and a lifetime of sports and physical activity without any such incidents.

During my recovery, I had plenty of time to reflect on what God was trying to teach me through this experience. Was I overconfident? Probably. Had I taken my good health and fitness for granted? Quite likely so. Was I prideful with regard to my snowboarding ability? Yes I was. Was there a good outcome to all of this? Absolutely. Upon reflection, it dawned on me that God was showing me my limits, and teaching me how to act in a sensible and deliberate way. I believe that God was protecting me from further injury as I was planning to attempt even more reckless runs and jumps during our trip.

My injury also provided an opportunity for God’s love to be manifested through others as my friends took care of me and nursed me back to health. Allowing others to care for me and letting God work through their hands gave me a deep sense of peace and contentment in spite of my weakness. Sometimes it is in our weakness that God shows his greatest power.

This Holy Week, let us recall Jesus’ immense suffering and sacrifices for us as we go through our own trials in life. May we always see the good in every situation, and bloom powerfully beyond our wildest imagination.

(Today’s Oxygen by Anonymous)

Prayer: Heavenly God, we pray that you will give us strength in our weakness and hope for our futures.

Thanksgiving: We thank you Jesus, for the instruments of your love scattered all around us. May we never lose sight of your unwavering care.

________________

THIRD READING

Exodus 14:15-15:1

The Lord said to Moses, ‘Why do you cry to me so? Tell the sons of Israel to march on. For yourself, raise your staff and stretch out your hand over the sea and part it for the sons of Israel to walk through the sea on dry ground. I for my part will make the heart of the Egyptians so stubborn that they will follow them. So shall I win myself glory at the expense of Pharaoh, of all his army, his chariots, his horsemen. And when I have won glory for myself, at the expense of Pharaoh and his chariots and his army, the Egyptians will learn that I am the Lord.’

Then the angel of God, who marched at the front of the army of Israel, changed station and moved to their rear. The pillar of cloud changed station from the front to the rear of them, and remained there. It came between the camp of the Egyptians and the camp of Israel. The cloud was dark, and the night passed without the armies drawing any closer the whole night long.

Moses stretched out his hand over the sea. The Lord drove back the sea with a strong easterly wind all night, and he made dry land of the sea. The waters parted and the sons of Israel went on dry ground right into the sea, walls of water to right and to left of them. The Egyptians gave chase: after them they went, right into the sea, all Pharaoh’s horses, his chariots, and his horsemen.

In the morning watch, the Lord looked down on the army of the Egyptians from the pillar of fire and of cloud, and threw the army into confusion. He so clogged their chariot wheels that they could scarcely make headway. ‘Let us flee from the Israelites,’ the Egyptians cried. ‘The Lord is fighting for them against the Egyptians!’

‘Stretch out your hand over the sea,’ the Lord said to Moses, ‘that the waters may flow back on the Egyptians and their chariots and their horsemen.’

Moses stretched out his hand over the sea and, as day broke, the sea returned to its bed. The fleeing Egyptians marched right into it, and the Lord overthrew the Egyptians in the very middle of the sea. The returning waters overwhelmed the chariots and the horsemen of Pharaoh’s whole army, which had followed the Israelites into the sea; not a single one of them was left. But the sons of Israel had marched through the sea on dry ground, walls of water to right and to left of them.

That day, the Lord rescued Israel from the Egyptians, and Israel saw the Egyptians lying dead on the shore. Israel witnessed the great act that the Lord had performed against the Egyptians, and the people venerated the Lord; they put their faith in the Lord and in Moses, his servant.

It was then that Moses and the sons of Israel sang this song in honour of the Lord: …
________________

Canticle of Exodus 15

R/: I will sing to the Lord, glorious his triumph!

________________

The Desert Journey Is Really Hard

The Lord is fighting for them against the Egyptians

In preparing the reflection for today, I watched Ridley Scott’s Exodus, which was released in 2014. For 90 odd years, Hollywood has produced various movies depicting Moses’ parting of the Red Sea to free the Israelites from the clutches of Pharaoh and the Egyptians. Over the years, CGI and animation techniques have improved. I was reading up on the technicalities of how this scene was created over the years. Can you believe that in a 1923 version, the effects were made by 2 slabs of jello?!

Today, as I read the verse and watch the film, what stood out for me was when the Israelites lamented and blamed Moses for bringing them out of Egypt. Though life in slavery was intolerable, but faced with dark clouds, a tumultuous way ahead and with no rainbow in sight, they felt that being in Egypt was better. “Was it because there were no graves in Egypt that you brought us to the desert to die? What have you done to us by bringing us out of Egypt? Like us today, the Israelites saw and felt with their own human eyes and hearts, and they were afraid and unsure of what was ahead of them. ‘It would have been better for us to serve the Egyptians than to die in the desert!’

Slavery was bad but the eating was good. Who can blame them? They were in slavery for 400 years. They may have been so numb to the hardship that they simply gave up. As the saying goes, ‘better the devil you know than the devil you don’t.’ We can get so comfortable with our pain and fears that we are too paralyzed to move on. Or are we so cosy in our comfort zone that we never think about making things better? Yes, change is never easy, change is not fun, change is downright scary but in this case, there is a ‘guaranteed return on investment’ — God’s promise.

I ponder on my life — my own journey to the Promised Land, I recognize that even as I make the journey forward, many a time I cast an eye back and wonder if I should have left my ‘Egypt’. I have often questioned if life would have been different had I stayed there. Things would not have been great but perhaps, it won’t be as dry and painful as it is now. The journey ahead to my Promised Land is certainly no shady, tree-lined boulevard either. The desert journey to get there is truly hard. And hearing the homily last weekend by my parish priest kept bringing home the message about dying to self – the true essence of the Christian life, in which we take up our cross and follow Christ. Dying to self is part of being born again; the old self dies and the new self comes to life.

And so I plod onwards on my journey, dying each day to myself, and looking ahead to God’s covenant with us.

As we await the coming of Easter in just a few moments dear brothers and sisters, draw strength from knowing that though things maybe a bit bleak now in your lives, though you may not understand why God has led you to where you are in your life journey today, know that God is with us and for us.

(Today’s Oxygen by Geraldine Nah)

Prayer: Lord, getting through the pain of the cross is possible only by going hand in hand with You. As you lead us out of the parched dryness of our own deserts, give us the courage to not look back, and the hope to keep moving forward. Amen.

Thanksgiving: Thank you Lord, for clearing the way ahead of us and leading us to where we are today. We may not understand your ways, but we trust that it is the better way.

________________

FOURTH READING

Isaiah 54:5-14

Thus says the Lord:
Now your creator will be your husband,
his name, the Lord of Hosts;
your redeemer will be the Holy One of Israel,
he is called the God of the whole earth.

Yes, like a forsaken wife, distressed in spirit,
the Lord calls you back.
Does a man cast off the wife of his youth?
says your God.

I did forsake you for a brief moment,
but with great love will I take you back.
In excess of anger, for a moment
I hid my face from you.
But with everlasting love I have taken pity on you,
says the Lord, your redeemer.

I am now as I was in the days of Noah
when I swore that Noah’s waters
should never flood the world again.
So now I swear concerning my anger with you
and the threats I made against you;

for the mountains may depart,
the hills be shaken,
but my love for you will never leave you
and my covenant of peace with you will never be shaken,
says the Lord who takes pity on you.

Unhappy creature, storm-tossed, disconsolate,
see, I will set your stones on carbuncles
and your foundations on sapphires.
I will make rubies your battlements,
your gates crystal,
and your entire wall precious stones.
Your sons will all be taught by the Lord.
The prosperity of your sons will be great.
You will be founded on integrity;
remote from oppression, you will have nothing to fear;
remote from terror, it will not approach you.
________________

Responsorial Psalm 29:2,4-6,11-13

R/: I will praise you, Lord, you have rescued me.
________________

You Are Never Alone

His anger lasts a moment; his favour all through life. At night there are tears, but joy comes with dawn.

 My baby has just hit a developmental leap. His level of awareness of his surroundings has surged and he now realizes there are things, situations, and sounds he feels afraid of. One of the major changes to him now is the awareness that I have left the room or space that he is in. This separation anxiety can strike even when he awakes suddenly from a nap. So he cries with an urgency that shocked me initially.

I began to reassure him of my presence by calling his name, speaking to him, and popping in his line of sight as I buzzed around the house doing my chores. I found myself telling him “You are not alone my darling” every now and then.

As I said this to him, I reflected on the readings today. In it, God tells his people in Isaiah that He is ever with them.

“I did forsake you for a brief moment, but with great love will I take you back.

In excess of anger, for a moment I hid my face from you.

But with everlasting love I have taken pity on you, says the Lord, your redeemer.”

Being a mother to my son has been a humbling journey and a process of unlearning the old ways I thought about love. As imperfect humans, we cannot help but operate on the duality of rewards and punishments, giving and withholding. I unconsciously love this way sometimes. But with my beloved son, there is never any withholding of my love and tenderness. Even in my exhaustion; my frustration with decoding his cranky and clingy needs; the external stressors of work-family balance, with God’s grace, I still manage to find the energy to attend to him. Even if it should mean forgoing my own needs, my me-time, or delaying my rest. What more of our heavenly Father who is perfect and all Love?

“my love for you will never leave you and my covenant of peace with you will never be shaken…”

Of course, this cannot be a one-time lesson in love. Many of us have been loved imperfectly in our lives and relationships. We have been angered, hurt and short-changed of our affections. But deep within us, I believe we all have a ‘dark memory’ of how perfect love feels like and should be. This subconscious awareness is the seed that triggers our lifelong search for what we call ‘true love’. Perhaps, like me, you have found human relationships tried and wanting. Perhaps, you are still trying to forgive and mend, or forget broken relationships. Maybe you think you have waited too long to be loved properly and are on the verge of giving up. Maybe you feel too broken to hope for more.

Do take heart that there will always be onward growth in your life. This is God’s promise to his sullied ‘bride’ Israel. God’s pity over his people is his great sorrow and sympathy for the mistakes you and I have made in our search for love and fulfilment. And His swift and immediate action is forgiveness and redemption.

Just as I will never leave my baby’s side, just as he is constantly on my mind as I buzz about the house doing a million things for the family… God is whispering gently to you “You are never alone my beloved.” Every now and then, He checks in on you by calling out your name, sending angels to encourage and journey with you, tugging you into his embrace with a longing and ache that you find impossible to be filled by the world’s distractions. This is your Abba Father who says, “Come back to me: I have loved you with an everlasting love.”

 (Today’s OXYGEN by Debbie Loo)

Prayer: Lord, I pray for the courage and grace to love myself as you have loved me.

Thanksgiving: I will praise you, Lord, you have rescued me. In my ignorance I have neglected you, but you never forget me.

________________

FIFTH READING

Isaiah 55:1-11

Thus says the Lord:

Oh, come to the water all you who are thirsty;
though you have no money, come!
Buy corn without money, and eat,
and, at no cost, wine and milk.
Why spend money on what is not bread,
your wages on what fails to satisfy?
Listen, listen to me, and you will have good things to eat
and rich food to enjoy.
Pay attention, come to me;
listen, and your soul will live.

With you I will make an everlasting covenant
out of the favours promised to David.
See, I have made of you a witness to the peoples,
a leader and a master of the nations.
See, you will summon a nation you never knew,
those unknown will come hurrying to you,
for the sake of the Lord your God,
of the Holy One of Israel who will glorify you.

Seek the Lord while he is still to be found,
call to him while he is still near.
Let the wicked man abandon his way,
the evil man his thoughts.
Let him turn back to the Lord who will take pity on him,
to our God who is rich in forgiving;
for my thoughts are not your thoughts,
my ways not your ways – it is the Lord who speaks.
Yes, the heavens are as high above earth
as my ways are above your ways,
my thoughts above your thoughts.

Yes, as the rain and the snow come down from the heavens and do not return without watering the earth, making it yield and giving growth to provide seed for the sower and bread for the eating, so the word that goes from my mouth does not return to me empty, without carrying out my will and succeeding in what it was sent to do.
________________

Canticle of Isaiah 12

R/: With joy you will draw water from the wells of salvation.
________________

Fully connected to God

Pay attention, come to me; listen, and your soul will live

We live in a world where internet connectivity is important. Indeed, it is almost inconceivable for a person to own a phone without mobile internet. We look for places with strong wifi signals and for each other to be in touch with one another. I remember once when my friends were totally completely clueless as to what to do when the hotel which they were living in did not have wifi. If we, who are so dependent on internet connectivity, can become so clueless in its absence, that means as Christians, we need to be in constant communion with God to be sure of what he desires of us.

Being in connection with God means that we need to be in constant communication with God. Just as data is often sent between a mobile phone user and his friends, we also need to communicate with God in prayer. The Church has a huge treasury of prayer which we can tap on to be in connection with God. Be it through quiet meditation, the use of Scripture to encounter God, or the use of song to bring ourselves to union with God, there is an important need for us to find the most suitable way to be with God and then continue.

This also requires us to be part of a community where we get to live out our lives in joy and happiness. Community living allows us to discover what it means to appreciate our faith as we journey with each other to discover what the will of God is for us. As we continue to reflect on our Easter Vigil readings, let us discover the great plan which God has for us in the Scripture readings and allow it to unfold in our lives.

(Today’s Oxygen by Nicholas Chia)

Prayer: Heavenly Father, we pray for us to remain connected to you in prayer and in worship as we enter into the wonderful love you have shown us.

Thanksgiving: We pray for those who continue to share the faith with others.

________________

SIXTH READING

Baruch 3:9-15,32-4:4

Listen, Israel, to commands that bring life;
hear, and learn what knowledge means.
Why, Israel, why are you in the country of your enemies,
growing older and older in an alien land,
sharing defilement with the dead,
reckoned with those who go to Sheol?
Because you have forsaken the fountain of wisdom.
Had you walked in the way of God,
you would have lived in peace for ever.
Learn where knowledge is, where strength,
where understanding, and so learn
where length of days is, where life,
where the light of the eyes and where peace.

But who has found out where she lives,
who has entered her treasure house?
But the One who knows all knows her,
he has grasped her with his own intellect,
he has set the earth firm for ever
and filled it with four-footed beasts.
He sends the light – and it goes,
he recalls it – and trembling it obeys;
the stars shine joyfully at their set times:
when he calls them, they answer, ‘Here we are’;
they gladly shine for their creator.
It is he who is our God,
no other can compare with him.
He has grasped the whole way of knowledge,
and confided it to his servant Jacob,
to Israel his well-beloved;
so causing her to appear on earth
and move among men.

This is the book of the commandments of God,
the Law that stands for ever;
those who keep her live,
those who desert her die.
Turn back, Jacob, seize her,
in her radiance make your way to light:
do not yield your glory to another,
your privilege to a people not your own.
Israel, blessed are we:
what pleases God has been revealed to us.
________________

Responsorial Psalm 18:8-11

R/: You have the message of eternal life, O Lord.
________________

Growing Old In A Foreign Country

…why is it that you are in the land of your enemies, that you are growing old in a foreign country…

 It’s been a long time since I last contributed to Oxygen. Last summer, my family and I moved back to New York after having lived in Hong Kong for over a decade. The journey has been long and oftentimes arduous. There has been an endless list of ‘to dos’ which, whenever one task is completed, a few more emerge. We’ve had to tie up many loose ends while trying to find new routines to follow. There have been many goodbyes and farewells said while trying to amalgamate into a new community. For my kids especially – they’ve had to start over in a new school while trying to navigate in an entirely foreign system. The list can go on and on… but the truth is…

My absence from writing has less to do about my life circumstances and more to do about my spiritual condition. I concluded that of all the things that have been going on with my life, contributing to Oxygen required me to sacrifice the most. I had grown tired of committing the time and energy to preparing the devotionals. I no longer wanted to be held to writing deadlines. I didn’t want to be accountable for studying and then interpreting scripture. Even more so, I didn’t want to write about standards and values that I myself could never live up to. I simply just don’t like to write. And so, I opted for the path of least resistance. I quit.

While I’ve found myself with more free time, that ‘freedom’ has come at a price. I’ve ended up devoting less time to God’s Word and have become a lot more anxious about the future. I’ve become more pre-occupied with the decisions and actions needed to be taken. And even bitter when things haven’t gone my way. It has been tiring and I’ve grown weary.

In the second passage from today, we read an excerpt from David’s song of praise to God. David’s passionate declaration of his love towards God was grounded on his view as to who God was to him… “my rock, my fortress and my deliverer… in whom I take refuge, my shield and the horn of my salvation, my stronghold.” (Psalm 18:2) Despite being under siege by his enemies and on the verge of defeat, David turned towards God to ask for deliverance from his troubles… “The cords of death entangled me; the torrents of destruction overwhelmed me. The cords of the grave coiled around me; the snares of death confronted me. In my distress I called to the Lord; I cried to my God for help.” (Psalm 18:4-6). And so God, in His infinite mercy, responded. He reached down from on high and took hold of me; he drew me out of deep waters. He rescued me from my powerful enemy, from my foes, who were too strong for me. They confronted me in the day of my disaster, but the Lord was my support. He brought me out into a spacious place; he rescued me because he delighted in me. (Psalm 18:16-19)

A few weeks ago, I felt a desire to catch up on some old Oxygen contributions. Upon loading up the website, I came across the call for volunteer writers for this upcoming Holy Week. Maybe this was God reaching down from on high and taking hold of me.

(Today’s Oxygen by Steven Su)

Prayer: Heavenly Father, we pray for forgiveness for all the times we’ve turned our backs to You. May the Holy Spirit guide us according to Your will.

Thanksgiving: Lord, we give thanks to You for Your great mercy. As we journey through this life, may we see that we are all living in a foreign country and that Your kingdom will be our eternal home — made possible not on our works, but through the sacrifice of Jesus.

________________

SEVENTH READING

Ezekiel 36:16-17,18-28

The word of the Lord was addressed to me as follows: ‘Son of man, the members of the House of Israel used to live in their own land, but they defiled it by their conduct and actions. I then discharged my fury at them because of the blood they shed in their land and the idols with which they defiled it. I scattered them among the nations and dispersed them in foreign countries. I sentenced them as their conduct and actions deserved. And now they have profaned my holy name among the nations where they have gone, so that people say of them, “These are the people of the Lord; they have been exiled from his land.”

‘But I have been concerned about my holy name, which the House of Israel has profaned among the nations where they have gone.

‘And so, say to the House of Israel, “The Lord says this: I am not doing this for your sake, House of Israel, but for the sake of my holy name, which you have profaned among the nations where you have gone. I mean to display the holiness of my great name, which has been profaned among the nations, which you have profaned among them. And the nations will learn that I am the Lord – it is the Lord who speaks – when I display my holiness for your sake before their eyes. Then I am going to take you from among the nations and gather you together from all the foreign countries, and bring you home to your own land.

‘“I shall pour clean water over you and you will be cleansed; I shall cleanse you of all your defilement and all your idols. I shall give you a new heart, and put a new spirit in you; I shall remove the heart of stone from your bodies and give you a heart of flesh instead. I shall put my spirit in you, and make you keep my laws and sincerely respect my observances. You will live in the land which I gave your ancestors. You shall be my people and I will be your God.”’
________________

Responsorial Psalm 41:2-3,5,42:3-4

R/: Like the deer that yearns for running streams, so my soul is yearning for you, my God.
________________

Protect His Kingdom

“Son of man, I have made you a watchman for the people of Israel; so hear the word I speak and give them warning from me.

When I read this passage, one of the first things I noticed was how God isn’t asking Ezekiel to ‘watch’ over His people. Rather, He is commanding Ezekiel to do it and protect the faiths and lives of Israel’s people. “Be their watchman”, He orders.

To put things into perspective, we need to understand that back in those days, watchmen were sentinels, posted along the outermost walls of a city. They were tasked with keeping an eye out for enemies both within and outside the city. Without them, a kingdom would fall into the hands of her enemies, her people’s lives ended or they would be forced into slavery. Basically, lives will be completely ruined.

We know that God has told us to defend his kingdom.

But what does this mean for us, the modern-day layman who doesn’t belong to an armed force? What enemies are we keeping an eye out for? What kingdom are we trying to protect?

The answer — We are in charge of keeping watch over the kingdom of God. This kingdom is the one that lies in our soul.

Our enemy — sin

Our weapon — The Word of God.

I try to make it a point to read the Bible every day. For me, it is how God talks to me and lets me know which turnings to take along the path He leads me. Not only does reading and hearing His word keep me from straying (too) far from that road, but it is also the best form of defence against the spiritual warfare we face everyday. The ways of the world are such that it is okay to tell white lies to save your back, promiscuity is perfectly normal, forgive but don’t forget, the list goes on and on.

It’s not enough to just read it though. We have to practice what we read and pray as well, just like Jesus commanded in Matthew 26:41 (NIV)

“Watch and pray so that you will not fall into temptation. The spirit is willing, but the body is weak.”

Brothers and sisters, as we prepare to celebrate Easter tomorrow, let us begin anew our journey towards God. Let us rebuild and strengthen our defences against sin. Let us pray we never fall asleep as we keep watch over God’s Kingdom that dwells in our hearts.

(Today’s Oxygen by Rebecca Grace)

Prayer: God, our holy Father, give us the strength and the willpower to stay awake to protect and defend your Kingdom against the evils of the world.

Thanksgiving: We thank you God, for the season of Lent, which has made our spirits stronger and brought us closer to You and to your son Jesus.

________________

EPISTLE 

Romans 6:3-11

When we were baptised in Christ Jesus we were baptised in his death; in other words, when we were baptised we went into the tomb with him and joined him in death, so that as Christ was raised from the dead by the Father’s glory, we too might live a new life.

If in union with Christ we have imitated his death, we shall also imitate him in his resurrection. We must realise that our former selves have been crucified with him to destroy this sinful body and to free us from the slavery of sin. When a Christian dies, of course, he has finished with sin.

But we believe that having died with Christ we shall return to life with him: Christ, as we know, having been raised from the dead will never die again. Death has no power over him any more. When he died, he died, once for all, to sin, so his life now is life with God; and in that way, you too must consider yourselves to be dead to sin but alive for God in Christ Jesus.

________________

Responsorial Psalm 117:1-2, 16-17, 22-23

R:/ Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia!

________________

Images of God

Death has no power over him anymore

There is a saying that a person is ‘a chip off the old block’ if their behaviour and, sometimes, even physical resemblance is similar to their parents. Indeed, the way people behave can sometimes tell us a lot about their upbringing and the company they hang around with. Similarly, as Christians who have experienced the death of the Lord on Good Friday, we also get to experience the Resurrection of our Lord Jesus.

The joy of being an Easter people means that we get to live in confidence that the sufferings which we go through on Good Friday, whilst tremendous and seemingly overwhelming, are actually nothing compared to the glory of the Resurrection which we will go through. All of us are going through or have been through suffering. Be it through the challenges we face at work, being a caregiver to a loved one, or even the financial problems, these things overwhelm us and make us realise how challenging it is to stay sane amidst these problems. We must remember that there is a reward to be seen at the end of the suffering, and this is how we enter into the life of Jesus more closely.

Just as Jesus went through much suffering when He was alive, we also have to go through suffering on this world. Yet, the suffering of this world will allow us to appreciate the joy which the Resurrection will bring to us once the suffering is relieved. The Epistle reminds us of the need to stay strong on our task and to never lose sight of our heavenly goal – which is to return to heavenly union with God.

(Today’s Oxygen by Nicholas Chia)

Prayer: Heavenly Father, I pray that you let us see that our problems are slight and that you will take care of us.

Thanksgiving: We give thanks for all who bring hope to this world.

 
________________

GOSPEL

Matthew 28:1-10

After the sabbath, and towards dawn on the first day of the week, Mary of Magdala and the other Mary went to visit the sepulchre. And all at once there was a violent earthquake, for the angel of the Lord, descending from heaven, came and rolled away the stone and sat on it.

His face was like lightning, his robe white as snow. The guards were so shaken, so frightened of him, that they were like dead men. But the angel spoke; and he said to the women, ‘There is no need for you to be afraid. I know you are looking for Jesus, who was crucified. He is not here, for he has risen, as he said he would. Come and see the place where he lay, then go quickly and tell his disciples, “He has risen from the dead and now he is going before you to Galilee; it is there you will see him.” Now I have told you.’

Filled with awe and great joy the women came quickly away from the tomb and ran to tell the disciples.

And there, coming to meet them, was Jesus. ‘Greetings’ he said. And the women came up to him and, falling down before him, clasped his feet. Then Jesus said to them, ‘Do not be afraid; go and tell my brothers that they must leave for Galilee; they will see me there.’

________________

Nothing to Fear

Do not be afraid.

It is interesting how, in today’s gospel, the first words Jesus speaks to the women were comforting words of reassurance. “Do not be afraid” he said, before giving them further instructions to pass on to the apostles. At almost every CER I have served, He inevitably sends me one of the prophet Isaiah’s well-known verses to reassure me that He is indeed lifting me up each and every day and giving me eagle’s wings to soar. For indeed, Christ has conquered death. So what else have we to fear?

In the past, I never truly understood or connected with the significance of Easter. It was just Christ ‘waking up’ after three days in the tomb. But now, Christ’s resurrection is more than just a physical one fo rme. I truly believe that His resurrection is a daily reminder that we must die to ourselves each and every day — at home, at work, in ministry. And in dying to ourselves, we are to surrender all our attachments to sin, to pride, envy, anger, sloth, greed, lust and covetousness. Easier said than done, especially when we also have to die to our loved ones, parents, colleagues, bosses and anyone else we encounter each day on our mortal journey here on earth.

If you think about it, we ‘die’ each night we lay down to sleep and are ‘resurrected’ each time we arise to a new day. How is it then that many of us are able to face each day with a strength and conviction that allows us to get out of the door? I think it is because we have some semblance of a ‘plan’, boring as it may seem – have breakfast, read the papers, head to the office, have lunch, attend meetings/do our work, head home, have dinner, watch some TV/surf the net, then go to bed. And the cycle repeats itself again. IF indeed we arise the next day.

But brothers and sisters, have you ever thought about those who are in depression, out of work, in counselling, or with nothing to look forward to each day? How would these people feel upon waking up in the morning? Some would dread having to face a new day with nothing to do, with no friends to meet up with, no-one to talk to. Life for them would literally be a ‘prison’ or a tomb of sorts, with darkness all around to engulf them. Perhaps that is how the apostles and Jesus’ followers felt after His death on the cross. That all was hopeless and life was going to be futile, not worth living at all.

Christ’s resurrection was more than just a physical ‘statement’. It symbolised an awakening of the spirit within his apostles and followers and it gave them the courage to persevere amid all kinds of challenges as they went about evangelising to the rest of the world. Today, as we prepare to welcome Christ again in his physical form, let us all take courage and live out our calling – to be prophets and evangelisers, to proclaim to the world that Jesus Christ is risen indeed. Alleluia!

(Today’s OXYGEN by Desmond Soon)

Prayer: Abba Father, we thank you for the gift of Jesus Christ, for His sacrifice on the Cross and for fulfilling the promise He gave to us.

Thanksgiving: Thank you, Father for reawakening in us the spirit of your son, Jesus Christ.

 

Wednesday, 31 January – Faith Comes With Humility

31 Jan – Memorial for St. John Bosco, priest

St. John Bosco (1815-1888) was the son of Venerable Margaret Bosco. His father died when he was just two years old, and as soon as he was old enough to do odd jobs, he did so for extra money for his family. Bosco would go to circuses, fairs, and carnivals, practise the tricks he saw the magicians perform, and then present one-boy shows. After his performance, while he still had an audience of boys, he would repeat the homily he had heard earlier in church.

He worked as a tailor, baker, shoemaker, and carpenter while attending college and the seminary. He was ordained in 1841. He was a teacher, and he worked with youth, finding places where they could meet, play and pray. He taught catechism to orphans and apprentices, and was chaplain in a hospice for girls.

He wrote short treatises aimed at explaining the faith to children, and then taught children how to print them. He was a friend of St. Joseph Cafasson, whose biography he wrote. He was confessor to Blessed Joseph Allamano. He founded the Salesians of Don Bosco (SDB) in 1859, a community of priests who work with and educate boys, under the protection of Our Lady, Help of Christians, and St. Francis de Sales. He founded the Daughters of Mary, Help of Christians, in 1872, and the Union of Cooperator Salesians in 1875.

– Patron Saint Index

________________

2 Samuel 24:2,8-17

King David said to Joab and to the senior army officers who were with him, ‘Now go throughout the tribes of Israel from Dan to Beersheba and take a census of the people; I wish to know the size of the population.’ Having covered the whole country, they returned to Jerusalem at the end of nine months and twenty days. Joab gave the king the figures for the census of the people; Israel numbered eight hundred thousand armed men capable of drawing sword, and Judah five hundred thousand men.

But afterwards David’s heart misgave him for having taken a census of the people. ‘I have committed a grave sin’ David said to the Lord. ‘But now, Lord, I beg you to forgive your servant for this fault. I have been very foolish.’ But when David got up next morning, the following message had come from the Lord to the prophet Gad, David’s seer, ‘Go and say to David, “the Lord says this: I offer you three things; choose one of them for me to do to you.”’

So Gad went to David and told him. ‘Are three years of famine to come on you in your country’ he said ‘or will you flee for three months before your pursuing enemy, or would you rather have three days’ pestilence in your country? Now think, and decide how I am to answer him who sends me.’ David said to Gad, This is a hard choice. But let us rather fall into the power of the Lord, since his mercy is great, and not into the power of men.’ So David chose pestilence.

It was the time of the wheat harvest. The Lord sent a pestilence on Israel from the morning till the time appointed and plague ravaged the people, and from Dan to Beersheba seventy thousand men of them died. The angel stretched out his hand towards Jerusalem to destroy it, but the Lord thought better of this evil, and he said to the angel who was destroying the people, ‘Enough! Now withdraw your hand.’ The angel of the Lord was beside the threshing-floor of Araunah the Jebusite. “When David saw the angel who was ravaging the people, he spoke to the Lord. ‘It was I who sinned;’ he said ‘I who did this wicked thing. But these, this flock, what have they done? Let your hand lie heavy on me then, and on my family.’

________________

Mark 6:1-6

Jesus went to his home town and his disciples accompanied him. With the coming of the sabbath he began teaching in the synagogue and most of them were astonished when they heard him. They said, ‘Where did the man get all this? What is this wisdom that has been granted him, and these miracles that are worked through him? This is the carpenter, surely, the son of Mary, the brother of James and Joset and Jude and Simon? His sisters, too, are they not here with us?’ And they would not accept him. And Jesus said to them, ‘A prophet is only despised in his own country, among his own relations and in his own house’; and he could work no miracle there, though he cured a few sick people by laying his hands on them. He was amazed at their lack of faith.

________________

‘A prophet is only despised in his own country, among his own relations and in his own house’; and he could work no miracle there…

Imagine a coworker who joined the company the same time as you, in the exact same team with the exact same responsibilities. You become friends and learn about each other, discovering in the process that you both come from similar backgrounds. So similar in fact, that you both might as well have grown up in the same house and done the same course at the same university.

Now, imagine that same coworker suddenly showing up at work one day, giving suggestions and instructions on how to solve a particular problem. No, he wasn’t promoted overnight but he knows a little bit more about this particular issue (because he learnt about it) than you do and thought he would help you.

Instead of accepting his solution, you choose to shut him down and question, “How could he possibly know more than me?” Both of you come from the same background, with the same education. How could he possibly know more than you?

In today’s gospel, this is the situation Jesus found himself in. The people in his hometown could not believe that he knew enough to teach about God and the Scriptures. After all, wasn’t he just a carpenter’s son? What right did he have to tell them how to live their life?

Their pride had clouded their judgment of Jesus. Instead of seeing him as the Messiah, they saw someone who had no authority on anything else besides carpentry and repair work. They were unnerved with the amount of authority Jesus spoke with. How dare he speak with such conviction?

Word would definitely have travelled far and wide of the miracles he performed but his very own people refused to accept the stories, insisting that it just wasn’t possible. Pride took over the people in the gospel and pride clouded their perception to the point their faith was stifled. Their lack of faith was what led to Jesus only being able to perform very few miracles among his people. What they failed to realize is that Jesus is a repairman. Both in his job and spiritually. He was sent to repair our faith and souls.

Most of the time, God talks to us through other people and pride has to be put aside in order to hear what He has to say. It’s not the easiest thing in the world to shut down your ego but we need to do it because we can’t serve both God and our ego. Humble yourself to God and see how your faith will grow and miracles happen in your life.

Let Jesus into your hearts so that he can repair your soul.

(Today’s OXYGEN by Rebecca Grace)

Prayer: Lord, help us let go of our pride so that we can let You into our lives, and forgive us for the weak moments when we unintentionally let our ego take over.

Thanksgiving: We give thanks, dear God, for the little miracles you perform in our lives and the wonderful people who act as your messengers for us.

18 November, Friday – Time to be cleansed of our sinful ways

Nov 18 – Memorial for the Dedication of the Basilicas of St. Peter and St. Paul

The Basilica of St. Peter is located within the Vatican City. It occupies a unique position as one of the holiest sites and as the greatest of all churches of Christendom. It is the burial site of St. Peter, one of the twelve apostles of Jesus, and, according to tradition, was the first Bishop of Antioch and later the first Bishop of Rome, and therefore the first in the line of the papal succession.

Catholic tradition holds that St. Peter’s tomb is below the altar of the basilica, which is why many popes, starting with the first ones, have been buried there. There has been a church on this site since the fourth century. Construction on the present basilica, over the old Constantinian basilica, began on Apr 18, 1506, and was completed in 1626.

While St. Peter’s is the most famous of Rome’s many churches, it is not the first in rank, an honour held by the Pope’s cathedral church, the Basilica of St. John Lateran. Contrary to popular misconception, St. Peter’s is not a cathedral, as it is not the seat of a bishop. It is properly termed a basilica.

The Basilica of St. Paul Outside The Walls is one of four churches considered to be the great ancient basilicas of Rome. This basilica was founded by the Roman Emperor Constantine I over what was believed to be the burial place of St. Paul where it was said that after the Apostle’s execution, his followers erected a memorial over his grave.

In 386 Emperor Theodosius I began the erection of a much larger and more beautiful basilica with a nave and four aisles with a transept. The work including the mosaics was not completed till the pontificate of Leo I. Under Pope Gregory the Great (590-604), the basilica was again extensively modified. As it lay outside the Aurelian walls, this basilica was damaged during the Saracen invasions in the ninth century. Consequently, Pope John VIII fortified it, the monastery, and the dwellings of the peasantry forming the town of Joannispolis which existed until 1348 when an earthquake totally destroyed it.

On 15 Jul 1823, the negligence of a workman repairing the roof resulted in a fire which almost totally destroyed the basilica. Alone of all the churches in Rome, it had preserved its primitive character for 1435 years. The whole world contributed to its reconstruction. The Viceroy of Egypt sent pillars of alabaster, and the Emperor of Russia sent the precious malachite and lapis lazuli of the tabernacle. The work on the principal façade, looking toward the Tiber, was completed by the Italian government, which declared the church a national monument.

The basilica was reopened in 1840 but was reconsecrated only 15 years later at the presence of Pope Pius IX with 50 cardinals. On 31 May 2005, Pope Benedict XVI ordered the basilica to come under the control of an archpriest. On the same day, he named Archbishop Andrew Cordero Lanza di Montezemolo as its first archpriest.

  • Wikipedia

_____________________

Apocalypse 10: 8-11

I, John, heard the voice I had heard from heaven speaking to me again. ‘Go,’ it said ‘and take that open scroll out of the hand of the angel standing on sea and land.’ I went to the angel and asked him to give me the small scroll, and he said, ‘Take it and eat it; it will turn your stomach sour, but in your mouth it will taste as sweet as honey.’ So I took it out of the angel’s hand, and swallowed it; it was as sweet as honey in my mouth, but when I had eaten it my stomach turned sour. Then I was told, ‘You are to prophesy again, this time about many different nations and countries and languages and emperors.’

_____________________

Luke 19:45-48

Jesus went into the Temple and began driving out those who were selling. ‘According to scripture,’ he said ‘my house will be a house of prayer. But you have turned it into a robbers’ den.’

He taught in the Temple every day. The chief priests and the scribes, with the support of the leading citizens, tried to do away with him, but they did not see how they could carry this out because the people as a whole hung on his words.

_____________________

When Jesus entered the temple courts, he began to drive out those who were selling.

The first thing that came to my mind after reading today’s gospel was — maybe it is time to detox the soul.

I’m a person who is very much into healthy eating and taking care of the body. However, I do not believe detoxes actually work, as our bodies come equipped with organs to do all the heavy-duty cleaning.

Our souls and hearts, on the other hand, are a completely different matter. These do not come with self-cleaning mechanisms. Instead, we need to roll up our sleeves, don some rubber gloves and get down on the floor to do some serious scrubbing. It is up to us to purge our souls and hearts, also known as the dwelling place of the Holy Spirit, from dirt and debris, better known as sins.

Jesus’ fury at seeing the traders selling and blatantly extorting temple visitors is probably what would happen if He saw the corruption that is taking place in our spirits as well. These traders had ‘contaminated’ a house of worship with their corrupt practices by overcharging temple visitors for the sacrificial animals and shekels (Jewish currency) they need to use.

In the gospel, He chases away all the traders demanding that they respect the House of God. “My house is meant for a house of prayer,” says Jesus quoting from Isaiah (56:7) and Jeremiah (7:11) respectively, “but you have turned it into ‘a den of thieves’.” In a similar way, let us pray that He can chase away the sins living in our soul and polluting His home.

But it won’t be easy, brothers and sisters, as we must also allow Him to come into our lives and guide us in this ‘spring cleaning’ effort. And unlike the temple in the gospel, this job requires us to play a part as well and work on purifying ourselves.

Remember, it is a never-ending job to keep dirt away. I mean, have you ever been able to just clean your room once and never have dust settle anywhere?

(Today’s Oxygen by Rebecca Grace)

_____________________

Prayer: Lord, we pray that you will guide and show us how to purify our souls in order to prepare the best dwelling place for You.

Thanksgiving: We give thanks for the ability to recognise our sinful ways Lord and the never-ending perseverance you give us to rid ourselves of sin.

17 November, Thursday – Can we recognise God’s love?

Nov 17 – Memorial for St. Elizabeth of Hungary, married woman, religious

Elizabeth (1207-1231) was a princess, the daughter of King Andrew of Hungary, and the great-aunt of St. Elizabeth of Portugal. At the age of 13, she married Prince Louis of Thuringia. She built a hospital at the foot of the mountain on which her castle stood, and tended to the sick herself. Her family and courtiers opposed this, but she insisted she could only follow Christ’s teachings, not theirs.

Once, when she was taking food to the poor and sick, Prince Louis stopped her and looked under her mantle to see what she was carrying; the food had been miraculously changed to roses. Upon Louis’ death, Elizabeth sold all that she had, and worked to support her four children. Her gifts of bread to the poor, and of a large gift of grain to a famine-stricken Germany, led to her patronage of bakers and related fields.

_____________________

Apocalypse 5:1-10

I, John, saw that in the right hand of the One sitting on the throne there was a scroll that had writing on back and front and was sealed with seven seals. Then I saw a powerful angel who called with a loud voice, ‘Is there anyone worthy to open the scroll and break the seals of it?’ But there was no one, in heaven or on the earth or under the earth, who was able to open the scroll and read it. I wept bitterly because there was nobody fit to open the scroll and read it, but one of the elders said to me, ‘There is no need to cry: the Lion of the tribe of Judah, the Root of David, has triumphed, and he will open the scroll and the seven seals of it.’

Then I saw, standing between the throne with its four animals and the circle of the elders, a Lamb that seemed to have been sacrificed; it had seven horns, and it had seven eyes, which are the seven Spirits God has sent out all over the world. The Lamb came forward to take the scroll from the right hand of the One sitting on the throne, and when he took it, the four animals prostrated themselves before him and with them the twenty-four elders; each one of them was holding a harp and had a golden bowl full of incense made of the prayers of the saints. They sang a new hymn:
‘You are worthy to take the scroll
and break the seals of it,
because you were sacrificed, and with your blood
you bought men for God
of every race, language, people and nation
and made them a line of kings and priests,
to serve our God and to rule the world.’
_____________________

Luke 19:41-44

As Jesus drew near Jerusalem and came in sight of the city he shed tears over it and said, ‘If you in your turn had only understood on this day the message of peace! But, alas, it is hidden from your eyes! Yes, a time is coming when your enemies will raise fortifications all round you, when they will encircle you and hem you in on every side; they will dash you and the children inside your walls to the ground; they will leave not one stone standing on another within you – and all because you did not recognise your opportunity when God offered it!’

_____________________

…you did not know the time of your visitation>

The temple of Jerusalem served as a symbol and reminder of God’s constant presence with his people in the city.

In today’s gospel, Jesus is there crying and lamenting for the city of Jerusalem. All because God had sent prophets and finally, His Son himself, to teach His people about having faith in God and following the right path to eternal life. Instead, the pride and arrogance of the Jews blinded them to the pure teachings of Jesus. They refused to acknowledge his presence and ‘visitation’ as their saviour.

I don’t like being told I’m wrong and should do things a different way. Let’s face it, none of us do; but sometimes, that method will turn out to be the better and more efficient way to accomplish something. It is when we realise that we were wrong all along and that, with that little nudge in the right direction, we’ve been set back onto the right path. We’ll also be thankful for the person who guided us back to where we were supposed to be headed.

Have you ever thought that that person might be God actually ‘visiting’ us? Probably not. We need to remember that God’s visits are meant to bring peace in our lives. Obviously, he isn’t going to be popping into our lives with tons of fanfare to announce His presence but will work through others, gently nudging us in the right direction. Sometimes not so gently, but it is all meant to make us better people.

In the same way a parent disciplines their child to make sure they grow up into a decent person, our heavenly Father also ‘disciplines’ us, but by using the hands of others.

Jesus’ prophecy in the gospel strongly echoes Jeremiah’s prediction of the destruction of the first temple of Jerusalem; but it also offered hope of faith restoration and deliverance from evil. “But this I call to mind, and therefore I have hope: The steadfast love of the Lord never ceases, his mercies are new every morning; great is your faithfulness.” (Lamentations 3:21-22)

Hence, our own peace can only be achieved when we give ourselves over to faith in God and let Him guide us instead of having our pride take over.

(Today’s Oxygen by Rebecca Grace)

_____________________

Prayer : Lord, we pray for the wisdom to recognise when You are trying to nudge us back onto the right path. May we never get upset at the person that You have chosen to teach us, through Your own subtle way, what it is You want us to do in this life.

Thanksgiving : We give thanks for everyone You have placed in our lives, past, present and future, that have helped mold us into who we are today.

10 September, Saturday – Live out your beliefs

10 September 

_____________________

1 Corinthians 10:14-22

My dear brothers, you must keep clear of idolatry. I say to you as sensible people: judge for yourselves what I am saying. The blessing-cup that we bless is a communion with the blood of Christ, and the bread that we break is a communion with the body of Christ. The fact that there is only one loaf means that, though there are many of us, we form a single body because we all have a share in this one loaf. Look at the other Israel, the race, where those who eat the sacrifices are in communion with the altar. Does this mean that the food sacrificed to idols has a real value, or that the idol itself is real? Not at all. It simply means that the sacrifices that they offer they sacrifice to demons who are not God. I have no desire to see you in communion with demons. You cannot drink the cup of the Lord and the cup of demons. You cannot take your share at the table of the Lord and at the table of demons. Do we want to make the Lord angry; are we stronger than he is?

_____________________

Luke 6:43-49

Jesus said to his disciples:

‘There is no sound tree that produces rotten fruit, nor again a rotten tree that produces sound fruit. For every tree can be told by its own fruit: people do not pick figs from thorns, nor gather grapes from brambles. A good man draws what is good from the store of goodness in his heart; a bad man draws what is bad from the store of badness. For a man’s words flow out of what fills his heart.

‘Why do you call me, “Lord, Lord” and not do what I say?

‘Everyone who comes to me and listens to my words and acts on them – I will show you what he is like. He is like the man who when he built his house dug, and dug deep, and laid the foundations on rock; when the river was in flood it bore down on that house but could not shake it, it was so well built. But the one who listens and does nothing is like the man who built his house on soil, with no foundations: as soon as the river bore down on it, it collapsed; and what a ruin that house became!’

_____________________

Why do you call me “Lord, Lord,” and not do what I tell you?

In today’s Gospel, Jesus tells us that there is no point constantly calling him “Lord”, the person we obey, if we do not actually do what he asks. And one of the things he asks of us is to scrape away the shaky, sinful layers in our lives. The very layers that built up over time when we became complacent of our salvation. When we unintentionally decided that having faith is enough. Actual action would not be required and all sin would be immediately deemed ‘null and void’ just because we believe in God. No repentance necessary.

It won’t be easy to shovel away the dirt and loose sand before we hit the hard rock to build our house on but when the storms of life come, all that cleaning would have been worth it because our faith is strong enough to weather it out.

We’ve all heard the phrase ‘Actions speak louder than words’, and nothing can be closer to the truth. The gospel also tells us that our actions are the fruits we produce. Not our knowledge of the Word. We can easily memorise the whole Bible (okay, maybe not THAT easily but you get the picture) but Jesus calls us to live out what we learn and believe in.

What we do is a reflection of what we believe in. It is these actions which actually demonstrate our Christian faith and belief. Do we forgive when we are wronged? Do we offer food to the beggar on the street? Do we hold the door open for the person behind us? Do we do everything the Lord has asked us to do?

Sure, people may form a first impression of us based on what we say but it is our actions that leave the lasting impression. It’s not just enough to do but we need to do with a willing heart. That is the mark of genuine belief – that everything we do is based on our belief that is so deeply anchored in our hearts, it’s second nature. Even our attitude is a testament to our faith in God.

My brothers and sisters, a good heart will produce good thoughts, that brings about good deeds, and good deeds are meant to be shared with everyone. This is how we show the world the Word of God. Like the song goes, “They will know we are Christians by our love.”

(Today’s OXYGEN by Rebecca Grace)

Prayer: Lord, we pray for the strength and willpower to scrub away our sinful nature, no matter how abrasive it is. Keep us strong dear Lord as we focus on filling our lives with good deeds while removing our harmful actions in our everyday lives.

Thanksgiving: We give thanks for the times You have picked us back up and took back our repentant selves each and every time we fell into sin.

9 September, Friday – Forgive before judging

9 September – Memorial for St. Peter Claver, Priest

He was born in Catalonia and studied at the University of Barcelona. He became a Jesuit; and while he was studying philosophy in Mallorca, the door-keeper of the college, Alfonso Rodríguez, saw that his true vocation was to evangelize the New World, and encouraged him to fulfil that vocation. (Rodríguez was later canonized on the same day as Peter Claver himself).

He arrived in Cartagena, in what is now Colombia, in 1610, and after his ordination six years later he became ‘the slave of the Negroes forever’, labouring on their behalf for 33 years, attending to both their spiritual and material needs. The slave trade was repeatedly condemned by the Popes; but it was too profitable to be stopped and on the whole the local church hierarchy kept quiet about it, much as they did in North America in the 19th century.

He brought fresh food to the slave-ships as they arrived, instructed the slaves and baptized them in the faith, followed their progress and kept track of them even when they were sent to the mines and plantations, defending them as well as he could from oppressive slave-owners. He organized teams of catechists who spoke the many languages spoken by the slaves. He worked in hospitals also, looking after lepers among others, and in prisons.

Naturally he made himself unpopular by his work: as his superior said, ‘unfortunately for himself he is a Catalan, pig-headed and difficult’. Opposition came from both within the Church and outside it, but there were always exceptions. For instance, while many fashionable ladies refused to enter his city churches because they had been profaned by the presence of the blacks, a few, such as Doña Isabel de Urbina, became his strong and lifelong supporters.

At the end of his life he fell ill with a degenerative disease and for four years he was treated neglectfully and brutally by the servant whose task it was to look after him. He did not complain but accepted his sufferings as a penance for his sins.

– Universalis

_____________________

1 Corinthians 9:16-19,22-27

I do not boast of preaching the gospel, since it is a duty which has been laid on me; I should be punished if I did not preach it! If I had chosen this work myself, I might have been paid for it, but as I have not, it is a responsibility which has been put into my hands. Do you know what my reward is? It is this in my preaching, to be able to offer the Good News free, and not insist on the rights which the gospel gives me.

So though I am not a slave of any man I have made myself the slave of everyone so as to win as many as I could. For the weak I made myself weak. I made myself all things to all men in order to save some at any cost; and I still do this, for the sake of the gospel, to have a share in its blessings.

All the runners at the stadium are trying to win, but only one of them gets the prize. You must run in the same way, meaning to win. All the fighters at the games go into strict training; they do this just to win a wreath that will wither away, but we do it for a wreath that will never wither. That is how I run, intent on winning; that is how I fight, not beating the air. I treat my body hard and make it obey me, for, having been an announcer myself, I should not want to be disqualified.

_____________________

Luke 6:39-42

Jesus told a parable to the disciples, ‘Can one blind man guide another? Surely both will fall into a pit? The disciple is not superior to his teacher; the fully trained disciple will always be like his teacher. Why do you observe the splinter in your brother’s eye and never notice the plank in your own? How can you say to your brother, “Brother, let me take out the splinter that is in your eye,” when you cannot see the plank in your own? Hypocrite! Take the plank out of your own eye first, and then you will see clearly enough to take out the splinter that is in your brother’s eye.’

_____________________

You hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take out the speck that is in your brother’s eye.

Raise your hand if you have ever been quick to pass judgement on someone without knowing the full extent of the situation. How about if you’ve delayed (or denied) forgiving someone because you firmly believe they’re in the wrong? Even if you know deep in your heart that you’re not a saint either.

It’s easy isn’t it? To criticize someone when they slip-up. Yet, how many of us are willing to look at our own shortcomings and criticise those instead? Theoretically, I would gladly say, “Of course, I am willing to take a look at myself and fix what’s wrong.” In practice however, I would never do it, or would do it extremely grudgingly and maybe once in 20 blue moons. I’m sure I’m not alone in thinking along these lines.

I couldn’t make it to World Youth Day this year but someone I know posted on Facebook the words of Cardinal Luis Antonio Tagle in the days leading up to it. “If we deny our wounds, we will inflict wounds on other people,” he told the crowd gathered in front of him.

If you think about it, this holds true for everyone. How can we even attempt to ‘fix’ someone else if we are broken ourselves? Yes, we as Christians are called to evangelise and shine the light towards God. But that in no way means hand them a book of instructions that we have yet to read and apply ourselves.

Jesus calls us to walk the talk in today’s Gospel and walk the talk, we must. So, let us try to practice forgiving each other, no matter how big or small the mistake. We may sometimes forget the wrong years down the road but the other person may never forget that they were never forgiven.

Remember, our journey towards God is not meant to be easy because changing is never easy. Lots of scraping and chiselling is needed to form a statue out of a block.

(Today’s OXYGEN by Rebecca Grace)

Prayer: Lord, we pray for the strength to forgive and forget the same way You do for us.

Thanksgiving: We give thanks for the people you’ve placed in our lives and the ways they have unintentionally hurt us. We know that this is Your way of teaching us to be more understanding and forgiving. Just as You are.

1 July, Friday – Salvation Does Not Belong Just to Us

1 July 

_____________________

Amos 8:4-6,9-12

Listen to this, you who trample on the needy
and try to suppress the poor people of the country,
you who say, ‘When will New Moon be over
so that we can sell our corn,
and sabbath, so that we can market our wheat?
Then by lowering the bushel, raising the shekel,
by swindling and tampering with the scales,
we can buy up the poor for money,
and the needy for a pair of sandals,
and get a price even for the sweepings of the wheat.’
That day – it is the Lord who speaks –
I will make the sun go down at noon,
and darken the earth in broad daylight.
I am going to turn your feasts into funerals,
all your singing into lamentation;
I will have your loins all in sackcloth,
your heads all shaved.
I will make it a mourning like the mourning for an only son,
as long as it lasts it will be like a day of bitterness.
See what days are coming – it is the Lord who speaks –
days when I will bring famine on the country,
a famine not of bread, a drought not of water,
but of hearing the word of the Lord.
They will stagger from sea to sea,
wander from north to east,
seeking the word of the Lord
and failing to find it.

_____________________

Matthew 9:9-13

As Jesus was walking on he saw a man named Matthew sitting by the customs house, and he said to him, ‘Follow me.’ And he got up and followed him.
While he was at dinner in the house it happened that a number of tax collectors and sinners came to sit at the table with Jesus and his disciples. When the Pharisees saw this, they said to his disciples, ‘Why does your master eat with tax collectors and sinners?’ When he heard this he replied, ‘It is not the healthy who need the doctor, but the sick. Go and learn the meaning of the words: What I want is mercy, not sacrifice. And indeed I did not come to call the virtuous, but sinners.’

_____________________

 “And indeed I did not come to call the virtuous, but the sick.”

I sometimes wonder why it is easy for us born into the Catholic faith to judge those of other denominations, especially those who belong to the newer churches. I’ve heard Catholics say that these brothers and sisters of ours just seem to be drifting from church group to church group. Not really sticking to one and always in search of that something – that special connection with God. In truth, this does not, in any way, make their form of worship wrong. In fact, I believe that God calls all of us to worship him differently.

In a way, we’re behaving like the Pharisees in today’s gospel. We believe we are the ‘elite’ who should have ‘exclusive access’ to Jesus, greeting and celebrating Him with all the necessary protocols in place. Now, I’m in no way putting down our rituals and sacraments. They are just as important as prayers, sacrifice and charity in Christian living; instead, I’m asking that we do not put down those who do not follow these customs.

We need to remember that Jesus came down from heaven to find and heal the lost and injured. To save them and to show them God’s love and mercy. Think about it — no one asks a doctor to make a house call if they’re well or are just in need of a check-up; it is always when we are so sick or left immobile that we call emergency and ask for an ambulance. Or call the clinic to ask a physician to come to our bedside.

Essentially, this is what today’s Gospel is trying to tell us. God made an appointment with His Son, Jesus, to treat and heal us. The tax collectors and sinners were the ones who needed ‘treatment.’; not the Pharisees who, seemingly, knew what already needed to be done in order to enter heaven.

After all, would those who believed that they were right wish to listen to someone tell them how to do what they thought they already knew what to do? No. Instead, those who are at a loss as to what to do, or have seen the error of their ways, are the ones who might actually listen and follow. Those whose spirits are craving to be back with God.

And it’s not just those who seem to be drifting from church to church or clinging on to ways we Catholics deem different from our own that need saving. We ourselves are just as lost, if not more, and are in just as much need of Jesus’ teachings, mercy and gift of salvation.

(Today’s Oxygen by Rebecca Grace)

Prayer – Lord, we pray that we may never judge others who have heeded your call, no matter what their past may be. Help us see that no Christian is perfect, only forgiven and saved by your merciful love.

Thanksgiving – We give thanks for sending your Son to save us from the shackles of sin. It was through his suffering and bloodshed that we were able to be reunited with you. Amen.

30 June, Thursday – Have Faith for the Forgiveness of Others

30 June 

Dear Readers, we apologise for the late despatch of today’s readings and reflections due to oversight to publish the post on my part. We wish you a blessed Thursday and weekend ahead. 

God bless,
Debbie

First Martyrs of the Church of Rome

These holy men and women are also called the ‘Protomartyrs of Rome’. They were accused of burning Rome by Nero, who burned Rome to cover his own crimes. Some martyrs were burned as living torches at evening banquets, some crucified, and others were fed to wild animals. These martyrs died before Sts. Peter and Paul, and are called “disciples of the Apostles. . . whom the Holy Roman church sent to their Lord before the Apostles’ death”.

Source: http://www.catholic.org/saints/saint.php?saint_id=3385

_____________________

Amos 7:10-17

Amaziah the priest of Bethel sent word to Jeroboam king of Israel as follows. ‘Amos is plotting against you in the heart of the House of Israel; the country can no longer tolerate what he keeps saying. For this is what he says, “Jeroboam is going to die by the sword, and Israel go into exile far from its country.”’ To Amos, Amaziah said, ‘Go away, seer;’ get back to the land of Judah; earn your bread there, do your prophesying there. We want no more prophesying in Bethel; this is the royal sanctuary, the national temple.’ ‘I was no prophet, neither did I belong to any of the brotherhoods of prophets,’ Amos replied to Amaziah ‘I was a shepherd, and looked after sycamores: but it was the Lord who took me from herding the flock, and the Lord who said, “Go, prophesy to my people Israel.” So listen to the word of the Lord.

‘You say:
‘“Do not prophesy against Israel,
utter no oracles against the House of Isaac.”
‘Very well, this is what the Lord says,

‘“Your wife will be forced to go on the streets,
your sons and daughters will fall by the sword,
your land be parcelled out by measuring line,
and you yourself die on unclean soil
and Israel will go into exile far distant from its own land.”’

_____________________

Matthew 9:1-8

Jesus got in the boat, crossed the water and came to his own town. Then some people appeared, bringing him a paralytic stretched out on a bed. Seeing their faith, Jesus said to the paralytic, ‘Courage, my child, your sins are forgiven.’ And at this some scribes said to themselves, ‘This man is blaspheming.’ Knowing what was in their minds Jesus said, ‘Why do you have such wicked thoughts in your hearts? Now, which of these is easier to say, “Your sins are forgiven,” or to say, “Get up and walk”? But to prove to you that the Son of Man has authority on earth to forgive sins,’ – he said to the paralytic – ‘get up, and pick up your bed and go off home.’ And the man got up and went home. A feeling of awe came over the crowd when they saw this, and they praised God for giving such power to men.

_____________________

Then some people appeared, bringing him a paralytic stretched out on a bed. Seeing their faith, Jesus said to the paralytic, “Courage, my child, your sins are forgiven.”

It is easy to pray for ourselves. Truth be told, I do it all the time. Almost every prayer of mine is dotted with, or centred around, what I want. Rarely, and I say this shamefully, do I remember to include what others have asked me to pray for. It is not done deliberately but out of forgetfulness. And it does make me feel bad. Especially if the other person is going through a very tough time and is seeking the power of communal prayer to help ease their burden or pain.

In today’s passage, Matthew says that Jesus sees the faith of the paralytic’s friends and bestows healing just because his friends believed in Jesus’ healing powers. Think about it, they travelled so far, carrying their poor friend on a stretcher and probably had to push and beg their way through an enormous crowd just to get to Jesus. Sure, the one who was healed would also have believed in Jesus; but, he wouldn’t have been able to get to Him if it hadn’t been for his friends.

This is also what praying together as a community can do for others. It makes our prayers more powerful, almost magnified, yet not being magnified in the sense that it gets louder and becomes practically like shouting in God’s ears. Instead, it is the fact that more than one person is asking for a certain miracle. It reflects our call to servitude. It is us asking God to free someone else of their troubles so that they can also experience the joys that come from living as one of God’s miracles.

 (Today’s Oxygen by Rebecca Grace)

Prayer – Lord, we pray for those who have asked us to pray for them. Let us not forget that we are all part of the Body of Christ and interconnected with each other.

Thanksgiving – We give thanks for your merciful love and forgiveness. For the very fact that just having faith in You is enough to heal us from any affliction. Amen.

26 April, Tuesday – Challenges Are Part Of The Journey

26 April

_____________________

Acts 14:19-28

Some Jews arrived from Antioch and Iconium, and turned the people against the apostles. They stoned Paul and dragged him outside the town, thinking he was dead. The disciples came crowding round him but, as they did so, he stood up and went back to the town. The next day he and Barnabas went off to Derbe.

Having preached the Good News in that town and made a considerable number of disciples, they went back through Lystra and Iconium to Antioch. They put fresh heart into the disciples, encouraging them to persevere in the faith. ‘We all have to experience many hardships’ they said ‘before we enter the kingdom of God.’ In each of these churches they appointed elders, and with prayer and fasting they commended them to the Lord in whom they had come to believe.

They passed through Pisidia and reached Pamphylia. Then after proclaiming the word at Perga they went down to Attalia and from there sailed for Antioch, where they had originally been commended to the grace of God for the work they had now completed.

On their arrival they assembled the church and gave an account of all that God had done with them, and how he had opened the door of faith to the pagans. They stayed there with the disciples for some time.

_____________________

John 14:27-31

Jesus said to his disciples:

‘Peace I bequeath to you, my own peace I give you,
a peace the world cannot give,
this is my gift to you.
Do not let your hearts be troubled or afraid.
You heard me say: I am going away, and shall return.
If you loved me you would have been glad to know that I am going to the Father,
for the Father is greater than I.
I have told you this now before it happens,
so that when it does happen you may believe.
I shall not talk with you any longer,
because the prince of this world is on his way.
He has no power over me,
but the world must be brought to know
that I love the Father
and that I am doing exactly what the Father told me.’

_____________________

…”We all have to experience many hardships,” they said, “before we enter the kingdom of God.”

As I’m writing this, “Victor’s Crown”, a praise and worship song, is playing on Youtube and this particular verse seems so relevant to today’s first reading.

“You will wear the victor’s crown. You will overcome.”

To follow Jesus is to abandon what the world wants and to do what God desires. Jesus did tell us to pick up our cross and follow Him. To do so, is to go through a lot of challenges. Practically everything that God wants seems to be against what the world tells us we should ACTUALLY want.

Brothers and sisters, facing trials and tribulations are necessary to shape us. We cannot grow if we do not leave our comfort zones. No one became successful without having to jump over at least one obstacle. More often than not, there were a lot more than just ONE obstacle to overcome. Scientists failed many experiments before discovering an effective drug. Inventors created plenty of junk before designing the perfect product. Even a butterfly has to break open its cocoon to be able to fly and reveal its beauty.

However, just because things can get tough for us at times, it doesn’t mean God has left us to fend for ourselves. He never asks us to take on more than we can shoulder. Instead, He presents us with difficulties so that we may develop or sharpen a “skill” that would help us in our mission. For example, He makes us humble through taking away a source of income (something we considered very important) so that we can be compassionate towards those who don’t have it.

It may be hard to see or believe but when all hope seems lost, God is still present. He gives us His grace so that we can get through the rough patch in our lives. He wants us to turn to Him. Depend on Him. Know that He is God. The secret is in prayer.

He does this so that we can receive and enjoy eternal life with Him in heaven. This is, without a doubt, the greatest reward of all. It is our “Victor’s Crown”.

(Today’s OXYGEN by Rebecca Grace)

Prayer – Lord, we pray for the strength to overcome the challenges You present to us so that we may grow in faith and love for both You and humankind.

Thanksgiving – We give thanks for Your unending grace that help us face the obstacles in this life. We also thank you for the comfort in the knowledge to know that You never abandon us in our times of need.

24 April, Sunday – Love Everyone

24 April – Fifth Sunday of Easter

_____________________

Acts 14:21-27

Paul and Barnabas went back through Lystra and Iconium to Antioch. They put fresh heart into the disciples, encouraging them to persevere in the faith. ‘We all have to experience many hardships’ they said ‘before we enter the kingdom of God.’ In each of these churches they appointed elders, and with prayer and fasting they commended them to the Lord in whom they had come to believe.

  They passed through Pisidia and reached Pamphylia. Then after proclaiming the word at Perga they went down to Attalia and from there sailed for Antioch, where they had originally been commended to the grace of God for the work they had now completed.

  On their arrival they assembled the church and gave an account of all that God had done with them, and how he had opened the door of faith to the pagans.

_____________________

Apocalypse 21:1-5

I, John, saw a new heaven and a new earth; the first heaven and the first earth had disappeared now, and there was no longer any sea. I saw the holy city, and the new Jerusalem, coming down from God out of heaven, as beautiful as a bride all dressed for her husband. Then I heard a loud voice call from the throne, ‘You see this city? Here God lives among men. He will make his home among them; they shall be his people, and he will be their God; his name is God-with-them. He will wipe away all tears from their eyes; there will be no more death, and no more mourning or sadness. The world of the past has gone.’

  Then the One sitting on the throne spoke: ‘Now I am making the whole of creation new.’

_____________________

John 13:31-33,34-35

When Judas had gone Jesus said:

‘Now has the Son of Man been glorified,
and in him God has been glorified.
If God has been glorified in him,
God will in turn glorify him in himself,
and will glorify him very soon.

‘My little children,
I shall not be with you much longer.
I give you a new commandment:
love one another;
just as I have loved you,
you also must love one another.
By this love you have for one another,
everyone will know that you are my disciples.’

_____________________

I give you another commandment; love one another. Just as I have loved you, you must also love one another.

In the book of Exodus, God gave Moses the Ten Commandments. Fast forward to the New Testament and Jesus gives his disciples this new (and final) commandment – Love one another just as I have loved you. This order from our REAL Commander-In-Chief sums up the original Ten Commandments, and is also (to me anyway) the toughest one to follow. To love someone seems easy, especially if it is someone whom we actually like. We willingly dish out respect, honour their wishes, and do almost anything to make and keep them happy. We’re also willing to forgive their mistakes at the slightest hint of an apology. Sometimes, no apology is even necessary.

When I saw this verse, the first thing that popped in my head was my vengefulness. I have real issues with people who have wronged me. Even if it was just once many years ago, that demon known as Vengeance will still come back to torment me. I have tried many times to let go, but trust me when I say it is not easy. Sometimes, I think I have finally let go but if they do just one tiny thing wrong, I will immediately be fuming on the inside.

This is where turning to the Bible has helped me a lot. It has revealed to me how Jesus truly lived. Not just what I learnt in Sunday School. Although those early Sunday morning lessons did help shape some of my Christianity, it cannot compare to what actually reading, and absorbing, the Word has done for my faith. Prayer has also been a source of soul-comfort.

In today’s Gospel, we are called to follow Jesus’ example and Jesus was all about love. He was sent to save the downtrodden, the hurt, the misguided, the marginalised, the hated. In a nutshell, the ones who are the most difficult to love. He performed so many miracles for them much to the chagrin of many of his disciples. Yet, He didn’t care because He knew that God created us to love each other, just as God loves us.

Brothers and sisters, let us emulate the same type of love that Jesus showed everyone more than 2,000 years ago. Let us be willing to treat everyone the same way we treat our own loved ones. Let us spread the same love God shows us to the rest of the world.

(Today’s OXYGEN by Rebecca Grace)

Prayer – Lord, we pray for the courage to give the same kind of love that Your son showed us. There will be many times when our egos get in the way of doing your works of love. When this happens, Lord, we beg for your forgiveness. Enable us, Lord, to show the world the same kind of forgiveness You give us. Amen.

Thanksgiving – Lord, we give you thanks for the gift of the Word. The Word that heals and the Word that guides us as we take each and every step closer to you. Amen.